UK Vol.60 (Post-EUref Vol.6 – BREXIT AND BEYOND Vol.1)

Here are excerpts from BREXIT AND BEYOND – HOW THE UNITED KINGDOM MIGHT LEAVE THE EUROPEAN UNION (PDF; Nov 2016) | @UKandEU @PolStudiesAssoc.

FOREWORD
Despite Michael Gove’s claims during the EU Referendum campaign that the public has ‘had enough of experts’, post-referendum uncertainty highlighted the need for experts to respond to the question of “what happens next?” …
Helena Djurkovic CEO, @PolStudiesAssoc

… When Theresa May declared that ‘Brexit means Brexit,’ she had hit upon a pithy and effective way of stymying debate in the short term as the political class headed off for their summer. It quickly became widely apparent, however, that tautology was not a clear guide to future policy.
…@ESRC… @CSBarnard24, @IainBeggLSE, Damian Chalmers (@LSELaw), @sarahagemann, @johunt, Michael Keating (@CCC_Research), Martin Lodge (Centre for Analysis of Risk & Regulation, LSE), @Usherwood and @RGWhitman …
@anandMenon1 Director, @UKandEU

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CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
The first stage is for the UK to invoke Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU), setting in motion the separation from the EU. … Despite provisions for the rest of the EU (rEU) to prolong the negotiations by unanimous agreement, most commentators consider it unlikely that they would be willing to do so.
… A ‘soft Brexit’ is commonly taken to mean continued Single Market membership, including free movement of not only goods but also services, capital and labour, as the non-EU states Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein have. The hardest ‘hard Brexit’ is usually understood to mean the UK having no preferential relationship with the Single Market and relying only on World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules. This implies not merely non membership of the Single Market (meaning the potential for non tariff barriers to be adopted, hindering trade) but also the imposition of tariffs on at least some trade in goods between the UK and the EU. …
… Devolution and the Northern Ireland peace settlement were designed and implemented during the UK’s membership of the European Union, and the EU provides an important framework for both. Key competences are shared between the EU and the devolved governments, with no UK-wide departments, but with institutional structures, such as the Joint Ministerial Committee (JMC)…

1.1 Does the referendum give a legally binding mandate for the UK to leave the EU?
…the last UK-wide referendum, which was on the Alternative Vote (AV) system for parliamentary elections. The legislation governing that referendum required the Government to bring into force the provisions governing AV in the event of a majority vote in support (Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011, s 8). The 2016 referendum can be seen as advisory only, creating no legal mandate for either the Government or Parliament to act on it. However, the language and politics of the campaigns make it difficult to see how the result could be ignored. …