Germany Vol.3 (German Federal Election 2017)

Here is information on the election.
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German elections 2017: full results (Interactive) | @guardian
Constituency seats won by party GermanFedElec2
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German election polls 2017 | @ft

Election of Members of the German Bundestag | Deutscher Bundestag

Bundestagswahl 2017: Electoral cartograms of Germany (09/25/2017) | Benjamin D. Hennig @ViewsofWorld
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Election Resources on the Internet: Elections to the German Bundestag | Manuel Alvarez-Rivera
The Electoral System
The Parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) consists of a lower house, the Bundestag, whose members are directly elected by universal adult suffrage, and an upper house, the Bundesrat, composed of representatives appointed by the Lander. The two bodies are not coequal chambers, with the Bundestag being the more powerful of the two.
The Bundestag is composed of 598 members elected for a four-year term of office. …
The composition of the Bundestag is determined by the Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) system – also known as personalized proportional representation – which combines elements of the single-member constituency plurality system with PR. Under this system, the country is divided into a number of single-member constituencies (Wahlkreisen) equal to half the total amount of seats in the Bundestag. There were 248 of these constituencies between 1957 and 1987, 328 between 1990 and 1998, and 299 since 2002. These constituencies are allocated among the Lander in proportion to the size of their populations, and seats are filled by the plurality or first-past-the-post method, under which the candidate obtaining the largest number of votes in each constituency is elected.
However, in addition to nominating individual candidates for the direct mandate (Direktmandate) elections at the constituency level, political parties set up lists of individuals at the Land level (Landesliste). Each German casts two votes, namely a first vote (Erststimme) for a constituency candidate, and a second vote (Zweitstimme) for a party list. Party lists are closed, so electors may not choose individual candidates in or alter the order of such lists. Of the two votes, the second vote is the most important, since it is the one that determines the composition of the Bundestag.
In order to participate in the proportional allocation of Bundestag seats, a party must receive at least five percent of all valid second votes cast; however, this requirement is waived if a party wins three or more constituency seats. …
…in 2013 Parliament passed a new electoral reform which introduces additional adjustment seats (Ausgleichsmandate) to achieve a fully proportional allocation of Bundestag mandates among qualifying parties, thus neutralizing any disparities resulting from the allocation of overhang seats.
Under the reformed system, all 598 Bundestag seats are allocated among the Lander in proportion to the size of their German population. Then, a non-binding allocation of seats among qualifying parties is carried out in each Land by the Sainte-Lague/Schepers method of PR; if a party wins more constituency seats in the first vote of a particular Land than the number of seats it would be entitled to according to the result of the second vote, it keeps the overhang seats. The nationwide seat total obtained by each qualifying party after adding up the results from all sixteen Lander is the minimum number of mandates the party is entitled to receive, and the size of the Bundestag is adjusted accordingly, so that each qualifying party secures at least its corresponding minimum seat total, but in a way such that the distribution of seats equals the nationwide allocation of mandates in the expanded Bundestag by the Sainte-Lague/Schepers method.
From this point forward, the system generally operates in the same way as before: the mandates obtained by each party are allocated at the Land level in proportion to the number of votes received by their Land lists; the direct mandates won by a party at the constituency level of a particular Land are then subtracted from the total number of seats allocated to that party’s list; and the remaining seats are filled by the candidates on the Land list in the order determined before the election. Nonetheless, if a party wins more constituency seats in the first vote of a particular Land than the number of seats it would be entitled to according to the result of the second vote, the distribution of seats among the party’s Land lists is adjusted so that each list is allocated at least its corresponding number of constituency seats, without changing the party’s nationwide seat total.

POLLYTIX GERMAN ELECTION POLLING TREND | @pollytix_gmbh

German Election | @bpolitics
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German election | @dw

GERMAN ELECTIONS 2017 | @politico

German election 2017: All you need to know about the vote (22/09/2017) | @HollyEllyatt @cnbc

German Election 2017 | @spiegel

What to watch in Germany’s election (09/24/2017) | @economist

GERMAN ELECTIONS 2017: THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM? (25/09/2017) | Alan W. Cafruny @ValdaiClub

German election results: AfD enters parliament with record-high 12.6% as Merkel’s alliance gets 33% Live updates (24/09/2017) | @rt

All Eyes on Germany ? Federal Election 2017 | @gmfus

Germany election 2017 | @reuters

ABOUT: GERMAN ELECTIONS 2017 | @EURACTIV

2017 GERMAN FEDERAL ELECTION | @unimelb

German federal election 2017

GERMANY FEDERAL ELECTION FORECAST | @gelliottmorris

The German Federal Election: Will Angela Merkel Stand Her Ground? (w Video) | @cfr

Zweitstimme.org’s Election Forecast | @zweitstimme_org

GERMAN FEDERAL ELECTION 2017? VOTE BY MEME (22/09/2017) | Willem Van Boxtel @tnf_webzine

The myth of the ‘boring election’: Populism and the 2017 German election | Fabian G. Neuner & Christopher Wratil @LSEEuroppblog

Germany federal election 2017: The final countdown | @SBS

2017 German Federal Election | WORLD ELECTION FORECAST

GERMAN FEDERAL ELECTIONS | @institutps

What to know about Germany’s general election on Sept 24 (09/22/2017) | @STcom

Delimitation of constituencies | @Wahlleiter_Bund
Map of constituencies for the elections to the 19th German Bundestag (PDF) | @Wahlleiter_Bund
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