US Policy Changes Vol.97 (Foreign Policy Vol.13)


Brittle Times for the Transatlantic Relationship (PDF; in large part in German) | Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook @ Atlantik-Brucke


Belfer Center Experts on U.S. Withdrawal from the Iran Nuclear Deal (05/08/2018) | Graham Allison, Nicholas Burns, Matthew Bunn, Chuck Freilich, Hassan Ahmadian, Martin B. Malin, Steven E. Miller, Payam Mohseni, Ernest J. Moniz, Sahar Nowrouzzadeh, Nawaf Obaid, Gary Samore, Elizabeth D. Sherwood-Randall, William H. Tobey @BelferCenter


A timeline of the Trump administration’s actions on Russia (07/26/2018) | @BrookingsInst


Kazakhstan Must Look Beyond the Belt and Road | Philippe Le Corre


Belfer Center Experts Offer Insight on U.S.-North Korea Summit


US Policy Changes Vol.94 (Foreign Policy Vol.11: NATO & G7 summit)

NATO


G7 Summit


https://twitter.com/dw_politics/status/1006171735367045122


Virginia Vol.4

Virginia1
Virginia2
Virginia3
The Commonwealth of Virginia
City of Virginia Beach
City of Norfolk
City of Chesapeake
City of Richmond
City of Newport News
City of Alexandria
City of Hampton


US Policy Changes Vol.91 (North Korea Vol.8)


US Policy Changes Vol.89 (North Korea Vol.7: US-North Korea summit meeting)


US Policy Changes Vol.88 (North Korea Vol.6: US-North Korea summit meeting)


US Policy Changes Vol.87 (North Korea Vol.5: US-North Korea summit meeting)


US Policy Changes Vol.86 (North Korea Vol.4: US-North Korea summit meeting)


US Policy Changes Vol.85 (North Korea Vol.3: US-North Korea summit meeting)


US Policy Changes Vol.84 (North Korea Vol.2: US-North Korea summit meeting)


Middle East Vol.10 (Iran Vol.6 – US Withdrawal from Nuclear Agreement)


Middle East Vol.9 (Iran and miscellaneous)

Op-ed: The Fruits of Iran’s Victory in Syria | Ariane Tabatabai @Lawfare
Donald Trump Doesn’t Understand What’s Happening in Iran (01/01/2018) | Ariane Tabatabai @TheAtlantic
“Fix” the Iran deal, but don’t move the goalposts (01/18/2018) | Robert Einhorn @BrookingsInst


How to Stop Iran’s Missile Program (12/10/2017) | Henry Sokolski and William H. Tobe @TheNatlInterest
How the Trump Administration is Boosting Iran’s Hardliners (10/10/2017) | Ariane Tabatabai @TheAtlantic
Managing U.S.-Iran Relations: Critical Lessons from the Iran-Iraq War (w PDF; November 2017) | Ariane Tabatabai Annie Tracy Samuel
Afghanistan: Another Victory for Tehran? (10/08/2017) | Ariane Tabatabai @lawfareblog https://lawfareblog.com/afghanistan-another-victory-tehran Nuclear Energy and the Spread of Nuclear Weapons: How Worried Should We Be? (w PDF; November 2017) | Nicholas L Miller @Journal_IS
Why Nuclear Energy Programs Rarely Lead to Proliferation (Fall 2017) | Nicholas L Miller @Journal_IS
Former Obama Deputy Secretary of Energy Dan Poneman On The Key Component To Lowering CO2 Emissions: Nuclear Power (Voice; 06/06/2017) | Hugh Hewitt


A Trump doctrine for the Middle East (04/16/2018) | Martin S. Indyk @BrookingsInst

Why Israel Needs to Escalate Its Threats Against Iran ? Right Now (04/14/2018) | Chuck Freilich @Haaretz
How the peace process killed the two-state solution (04/12/2018) | Khaled Elgindy @BrookingsInst
Israel and Trump are at odds on Syria (04/11/2018) | Natan Sachs @BrookingsInst


Middle East Vol.8 (Syria Vol.2)


Trump’s “Red Line” Moment in Syria? (04/12/2018) | BENNETT SEFTEL @thecipherbrief
The International Community Will Not Tolerate the Normalization of the Use of Chemical Weapons | James A. (Sandy) Winnefeld, Jr. @CBSNews
Can a one-off military strike deter Syria’s Assad from using chemical weapons again? The data suggests no (04/11/2018) | Chris Meserole @BrookingsInst
Op-ed: Trump’s Problem in Syria? It Was Obama’s Too | Susan Rice @nytimes
DEEP DISH: WHAT DID THE SYRIA STRIKE ACCOMPLISH? (Podcast; 04/19/2018) | Greg Jaffe, Ivo Daalder, Brian Hanson @ChicagoCouncil
Op-ed: Mission Far From Accomplished in Syria | Simon Saradzhyan @RussiaMatters
TV Interview: No ‘Thank-you’ Yet for Trump Before Job is Done in Syria | Meghan O’Sullivan @CNBC
How do we prevent ISIS 2.0? Withdrawing from Syria is not the answer (04/07/2018) | Pavel K. Baev, Ryan Crocker, and Michael E. O’Hanlon @BrookingsInst
Op-ed: Trump’s Syria whiplash (04/11/2018) | Amanda Sloat @BrookingsInst
Reasons W Should be Skeptical About the U.S.-led Attacks on Syria | Rami Khouri @agenceglobal
President Trump’s Syria Strikes Are Not About Syria (04/16/2018) | Robert M. Danin @MEastMatters @CFR_org
Op-ed: Has Trump Become a Realist? | Stephen Walt @ForeignPolicy
Op-ed: The War is the Vortex of Roughly Three Conflicts | Karl Kaiser @ Metro UN
The World After Trump: How the System Can Endure | Jake Sullivan @ForeignAffairs
Op-ed: The Problem With “Cold War” Comparisons | Odd Arne Westad @newrepublic
On Donald Trump and Russia (04/09/2018) | Danielle Pletka @AEI
Pushing back Russia in the Middle East: A thought experiment (04/13/2018) | Daniel L. Byman @BrookingsInst


Middle East Vol.7 (Syria Vol.1)


Alabama Vol.2


https://twitter.com/GRIDmdv/status/978727104811380736


https://twitter.com/AlabamaMBB/status/971846136737779712


UK Vol.109 (Post-EUref #Brexit Vol.33)


US Policy Changes Vol.82 (Asia Vol.2)

Great stuff!

Can China Back Down? Crisis De-escalation in the Shadow of Popular Opposition (w PDF; Winter 2017/18) | Kai Quek, Alastair Iain Johnston @BelferCenter
The autocrat’s Achilles’ heel (02/05/2018) | Alina Polyakova and Torrey Taussig
One Kim to rule them all (02/18/2018) | Nicholas Eberstadt @AEI
THE EDUCATION OF KIM JONG-UN (February 2018) | JUNG H. PAK @BrookingsInst
US Approach to Russia in New Nuclear Posture Review Risks Boosting Chances of Conflict (02/02/2018) | Jon Wolfsthal @russia_matters


Ex-CIA analysts explain why a bloody nose policy on North Korea would backfire (02/12/2018) | Jung H. Pak, Sue Mi Terry, and Bruce Klingner @BrookingsInst


US Policy Changes Vol.80 (Middle East Vol.6)

Great stuff!


Are Oil Prices Heading for Another Spike? (01/31/2018) | Carmen Reinhart, Vincent Reinhart @ProSyn @BelferCenter
OPEC’s Misleading Narrative About World Oil Supply (w PDF; March 2017) | Leonardo Maugeri @BelferCenter
Inside the Middle East Q&A: Ali Ahmad on Nuclear Power and Energy in the Middle East (Podcast; 02/20/2018) | @BelferCenter
A Lasting Defeat: The Campaign to Destroy ISIS (October 2017) | Ash Carter @BelferCenter
The Syrian crisis: A reckoning and a road map (09/12/2017) | Itamar Rabinovich @BrookingsInst
Don’t underestimate Kurdistan’s resilience (09/22/2017) | Ranj Alaaldin @BrookingsInst
A political surge is what’s needed in Afghanistan (05/30/2017) | Douglas Lute @thehill
Is it time for India to play a role in Israeli-Palestinian peace? (02/22/2018) | Kadira Pethiyagoda @BrookingInst
Who is responsible for solving Gaza’s massive electricity crisis? (02/05/2018) | Diana B. Greenwald @washingtonpost
Iran and Israel face off in Syria, as if it wasn’t complicated enough (02/13/2018) | Dror Michman and Yael Mizrahi-Arnaud @Brookingsinst
A Poorly Negotiated Saudi Nuclear Deal Could Damage Future Regional Relationships (02/05/2018) | Henry Sokolski, William H. Tobey @TheNatlInterest
Saudi Reforms Get a Boost From Google (02/04/2018) | Karen Elliott House @WSJ
Trump, Jerusalem, and a dispensable Arab region (12/06/2017) | Rami G. Khouri @agenceglobal
Jerusalem: securing spaces in holy places (07/31/2017) | Beverley Milton-Edwards @BrookingsInst
Jerusalem: After 30 years of hope and failure, what’s next for Israel/Palestine? (12/13/2017) | Hady Amr @BrookingsInst
Has Israel Grown Too Dependent on the United States? (02/05/2018) | Chuck Freilich @mosaicmag
How much does BDS threaten Israel’s economy? (01/26/2018) | Dany Bahar and Natan Sachs @BrookingsInst
The two things that will determine Netanyahu’s fate (02/15/2018) | Natan Sachs @BrookingsInst
Trump Wants to Attack North Korea? He Should Learn from Israel First (02/01/2018) | David Ignatius @washingtonpost
Cooperation in the Libya WMD Disarmament Case (PDF) | William Tobey
Verifying the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons and Providing Assurance against Breakout (w PDF; February 2018) | John Carlson @BelferCenter
The World Doesn’t Need Any More Nuclear Strategies (02/06/2018) | Stephen M. Walt @ForeignPolicy


US Policy Changes Vol.79 (National Defense Strategy, National Security Strategy, Geopolitics, Transatlantic divide, et al.)

Great stuff!


Repair and Rebuild: Balancing New Military Spending for a Three-Theater Strategy | Mackenzie Eaglen @AEI
Questions about the Nuclear Posture Review (02/05/2018) | Steven Pifer @Belfercenter
Watch: Experts discuss an era of new geopolitics (w Video; 02/07/2018) | Ryan Hass, Bruce Jones, Robert Kagan, Suzanne Maloney, Jung H. Pak, Alina Polyakova, and Thomas Wright @BrookingsInst
Making Sense of the U.S. National Defense Strategy (02/05/2018) | Kevin Ryan @CarnegieRussia Moscow Center


Restoring equilibrium: U.S. policy options for countering and engaging Russia (w PDF: February 2018) | Sergey Aleksashenko, Pavel K. Baev, Michael E. O’Hanlon, Steven Pifer, Alina Polyakova, Angela Stent, Strobe Talbott, Thomas Wright, Torrey Taussig, and Bruce Jones @BrookingsInst
A Humpty Dumpty Europe, feat. Cathryn Cluver Ashbrook (Podcast; 02/01/2018) | @BelferCenter
Normal is over: Europeans hope that the Trump era is an anomaly. But the transatlantic divide has never been so stark (w PDF; February 2018) | Constanze Stelzenmuller @BrookingsInst
What did Trump say and not say about foreign policy in Tuesday’s speech? (w PDF; 01/31/2018) | @NewsHour
Trump, Nunes and the politicisation of intelligence (02/07/2018) | Calder Walton @prospect_uk


Georgia Vol.1

USGeorgia
State of Georgia Industries @gdecd
@ExploreGeorgia Regions & Cities
Georgia’s Top 100 Public Companies (09/2016) | @GeorgiaTrend
@TAGthink State of the Industry Report
Aerospace (PDF)
@GAagribusiness website
Georgia Council for the Arts
Georgia Automotive Manufacturers Association, Inc.
Deal announces launch of Georgia Defense Exchange
@GeorgiaTech Energy and Sustainable Infrastructure
Economic Contributions of the Georgia Film and Television Industry (PDF; 02/28/2011) | Meyers Norris Penny
@fintechatlanta Resources
The Food Processing Industry in Georgia (PDF) | @universityofga
@Georgia_Bio news
Georgia: A Thriving Supply Chain Hub (11/08/2011) | Governor Nathan Deal @TIDRoundup
Georgia Association of Manufacturers
The Commercial Music Industry in Atlanta and the State of Georgia – An Economic Impact Study (PDF) | @GeorgiaStateU Fiscal Research Center
City of Atlanta Departments
Five reasons Atlanta is the new hotbed for digital entertainment (04/07/2015) | @ajc
City of Augusta Departments
City of Savannah Department Directory
@gacities
@GAChamber
@atlchamber
@Augusta_Chamber
@SavChamber
@ColCtyGAChamber
@InvestAtlanta


US Policy Changes Vol.77 (Asia Vol.1)

Great stuff!

The general public thinks the average company makes a 36% profit margin, which is about 5X too high, Part II (01/15/2018) | Mark J. Perry @AEI

Part I (04/02/2015)

Is another debt crisis on the way? (12/18/2017) | Kemal Dervi? @BrookingsInst

Realism and North Korea (07/02/2017) | James Winnefeld and Michael Morell @thecipherbrief

Avoiding nuclear conflict on the Korean peninsula (Podcast; 01/17/2018) | Ryan Hass, Bruce Jones, Jung H. Pak, and Adrianna Pita @BrookingsInst

Beyond maximum pressure: A pathway to North Korean denuclearization (w PDF; December 2017) | Jung H. Pak and Ryan Hass @BrookingsInst

Understanding the North Korea Threat (12/06/2017) | Joseph S. Nye @BelferCenter

North Korea’s Biological Weapons Program: The Known and Unknown (October 2017) | Elizabeth Philipp, Hyun-Kyung Kim, Hattie Chung @BelferCenter

Approaching the North Korea challenge realistically (w PDF; 08/14/2017) | Robert Einhorn @BrookingsInst

Why deterring and containing North Korea is our least bad option (08/08/2017) | Jeffrey A. Bader @BrookingsInst

The Korean nuclear issue: Past, present, and future: A Chinese perspective (04/30/2017) | Fu Ying @BrookingsInst

Can Chinese banks identify North Korean sanctions evaders? (04/10/2017) | Aaron Arnold @BulletinAtomic

What Can Vietnam Learn From China’s Economic Retaliation Against South Korea?: China’s punishment for THAAD could preview what Vietnam can expect if South China Sea tensions rise too high. (03/29/2017) | Viet Phuong Nguyen @Diplomat_APAC

Freedom of Navigation in the South China Sea: A Practical Guide (June 2017) | Eleanor Freund / Andrew Facini @BelferCenter

Was pre-Trump U.S. policy towards China based on “false” premises?: China in Trump’s National Security Strategy (12/22/2017) | Jeffrey A. Bader and Ryan Hass @BrookingsInst

Is Chinese Nationalism Rising? Evidence from Beijing (w PDF; Winter 2016/17) | Alastair Iain Johnston @Journal_IS

Balancing China: How to Check Chinese Military Expansion in East Asia (w PDF; November 2017) | Michael Beckley @BelferCenter

China, America and the Thucydides Trap: An interview with Graham Allison (23/08/2017) | Sam Roggeveen @LowyInstitute

The troubling U.S.-China face-off (June 2017) | Harvard Gazette

Avoiding war: Containment, competition, and cooperation in U.S.-China relations (w PDF; 11/21/2017) | David Dollar, Ryan Hass, Robert Kagan, Kenneth G. Lieberthal, Cheng Li, Mira Rapp-Hooper, Jonathan Stromseth, Bruce Jones, and Tarun Chhabra

How China Cheats (11/02/2017) | Derek Scissors @NRO

Trump’s War – More Risk Than Reward for US Military Involvement in Afghanistan (w Video; 08/22/2017) | Rolf Mowatt-Larssen @JustSecurity

The outlines of Trump’s Asia strategy: The President’s Asian trip sketched out a smart approach to containing North Korea, competing with China, and rebuilding trust with allies. Now comes the time to fill in the blanks. (11/17/2017) | Dan Blumenthal @AEI

The new geopolitics of trade in Asia (11/15/2017) | Mireya Solis @BrookingsInst

Russia, China and the Uncertain Future of the Collective West: Q&A with Kevin Rudd (03/29/2017) | @russia_matters

After the INF Treaty: An Objective Look at US and Russian Compliance, Plus a New Arms Control Regime (12/07/2017) | Kevin Ryan @russia_matters

Putin’s disinformation war on the West (Podcast; 12/15/2017) | Alina Polyakova and Fred Dews @BrookingsInst

Dreaming Spies: The Inside Story of the KGB at Oxford (12/01/2017) | Calder Walton @prospect_uk

Russia’s Lasting Influence in Central Asia (11/19/2017) | Morena Skalamera @Survival

TPPs for success: Here is how India can use this gamechanger agreement (07/17/2017) | Harsha Vardhana Singh @BrookingsInst

Tokyo and Washington Have Another Nuclear Problem: There’s a plutonium arms race brewing in East Asia that could see China, Japan, and South Korea with the capability to make tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. (08/17/2017) | HENRY SOKOLSKI, WILLIAM TOBEY @ForeignPolicy

Some reflections on Japanese monetary policy (05/23/2017) | Ben S. Bernanke @BrookingsInst

‘There were just so many things that I was curious about’ (05/09/2017) | Harvard Gazette


Middle East Vol.4 (Iran Vol.4 – Nuclear Agreement Vol.4)

What the Iran nuclear deal means for oil prices (07/15/2017) | @bradplumer @vox
Oil prices slide as Iran’s nuclear deal spells trouble for U.S. shale (07/14/2015) | Geoffrey Smith @fortune
How Would The Iran Nuclear Deal Impact Oil Prices? (06/29/2015) | @forbes
Iran-US Interim Agreement: Historic Breakthrough or Historic Sellout? (12/10/2013) | Dr James Petras @NewsBud_
Iran-US Regional Relations Subsequent to Nuclear Agreement (07/26/2015) | Masoud Rezaei @Iran_Review
World powers reach nuclear deal with Iran to freeze its nuclear program (11/24/2013) | Anne Gearan and Joby Warrick @washingtonpost
Why Europe Backs Obama on Iran (04/07/2015) | Carl Bildt @berggruenInst @HuffPost
Iran Nuclear Agreement | @plough_shares
Iran: Inside the Deal | @AJEnglish
Nuclear Iran | @cbsnews
Iran | @bilaterals_org


Middle East Vol.3 (Iran Vol.3 – Nuclear Agreement Vol.3)

Ernest J. Moniz Addresses Global Nuclear Risks (Speech; 01/11/2018)
Information Note on EU sanctions to be lifted under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) (PDF; 23/01/2016)
Annex II: Sanctions-related commitments | @StateDept


Iran: One year since sanctions relief (17/01/2017) | Henry Smith @Control_Risks
Iran: Flexibility in contract negotiations to arise out of uneven enforcement of local content regulations (10/05/2017) | Henry Smith @Control_Risks


Middle East Vol.1 (Iran Vol.1 – Nuclear Agreement Vol.1)


US Policy Changes Vol.74 (National Security Strategy)

The below excerpt of National Security Strategy of the United States of America DECEMBER 2017 (PDF) is on our own.

The American people elected me to make America great again. …
During my first year in office, you have witnessed my America First foreign policy in action. …
The United States faces an extraordinarily dangerous world, filled with a wide range of threats that have intensified in recent years. …
We are rallying the world against the rogue regime in North Korea and confronting the danger posed by the dictatorship in Iran, which those determined to pursue a flawed nuclear deal had neglected. …
At home, we have restored confidence in America’s purpose. …
The whole world is lifted by America’s renewal and the reemergence of American leadership. …

pp.1-4 INTRODUCTION
… Putting America first is the duty of our government and the foundation for U.S. leadership in the world.
A strong America is in the vital interests of not only the American people, but also those around the world who want to partner with the United States in pursuit of shared interests, values, and aspirations.
… Liberty and independence have given us the flourishing society Americans enjoy today-a vibrant and confident Nation, welcoming of disagreement and differences, but united by the bonds of history, culture, beliefs, and principles that define who we are.
… American political, business, and military leaders worked together with their counterparts in Europe and Asia to shape the post-war order through the United Nations, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and other institutions designed to advance our shared interests of security, freedom, and peace. …
A Competitive World
… China and Russia challenge American power, influence, and interests, attempting to erode American security and prosperity. …
…jihadist terrorists such as ISIS and al-Qa’ida continue to spread a barbaric ideology that calls for the violent destruction of governments and innocents they consider to be apostates. …
… North Korea-a country that starves its own people-has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons that could threaten our homeland. …
An America First National Security Strategy
First, our fundamental responsibility is to protect the American people, the homeland, and the American way of life.
Second, we will promote American prosperity. …
Third, we will preserve peace through strength by rebuilding our military so that it remains preeminent, deters our adversaries, and if necessary, is able to fight and win. …
Fourth, we will advance American influence because a world that supports American interests and reflects our values makes America more secure and prosperous. …

pp.7-14 PILLAR I: PROTECT THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, THE HOMELAND, AND THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE (“July 2017”)
… North Korea seeks the capability to kill millions of Americans with nuclear weapons. … Non-state actors undermine social order through drug and human trafficking networks…
Secure U.S. Borders and Territory
Defend Against Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)
…deploying a layered missile defense system focused on North Korea and Iran to defend… Enhanced missile defense is not intended to undermine strategic stability or disrupt longstanding strategic relationships with Russia or China. …
Combat Biothreats and Pandemics
Strengthen Border Control and Immigration Policy
Pursue Threats to Their Source
Defeat Jihadist Terrorists
Dismantle Transnational Criminal Organizations
Keep America Safe in the Cyber Era
…assess risk across six key areas: national security, energy and power, banking and finance, health and safety, communications, and transportation. …
Promote American Resilience

pp.17-23 PILLAR II: PROMOTE AMERICAN PROSPERITY (“November 2017”)
… Working with our allies and partners, the United States led the creation of a group of financial institutions and other economic forums that established equitable rules and built instruments to stabilize the international economy and remove the points of friction that had contributed to two world wars. …
… Experience shows that these countries distorted and undermined key economic institutions without undertaking significant reform of their economies or politics. They espouse free trade rhetoric and exploit its benefits, but only adhere selectively to the rules and agreements. …
Rejuvenate the Domestic Economy
… Departments and agencies will eliminate unnecessary regulations that stifle growth, drive up costs for American businesses, impede research and development, discourage hiring, and incentivize domestic businesses to move overseas. …
… Federal, state, and local governments will work together with private industry to improve our airports, seaports and waterways, roads and railways, transit systems, and telecommunications. …
Promote Free, Fair, and Reciprocal Economic Relationships
…will pursue bilateral trade and investment agreements with countries that commit to fair and reciprocal trade and will modernize existing agreements to ensure they are consistent with those principles. …
Lead in Research, Technology, Invention, and Innovation
… The Department of Defense and other agencies will establish strategic partnerships with U.S. companies to help align private sector R&D resources to priority national security applications. …
Promote and Protect the U.S. National Security Innovation Base
…will reduce the illicit appropriation of U.S. public and private sector technology and technical knowledge by hostile foreign competitors. …
…will review visa procedures to reduce economic theft by non-traditional intelligence collectors. …
Embrace Energy Dominance
…will streamline the Federal regulatory approval processes for energy infrastructure, from pipeline and export terminals to container shipments and gathering lines, while also ensuring responsible environmental stewardship.

pp.25-35 PILLAR III: PRESERVE PEACE THROUGH STRENGTH (“DECEMBER 2017”)
… Three main sets of challengers-the revisionist powers of China and Russia, the rogue states of Iran and North Korea, and transnational threat organizations, particularly jihadist terrorist groups-are actively competing against the United States and our allies and partners. …
… China and Russia want to shape a world antithetical to U.S. values and interests. China seeks to displace the United States in the Indo-Pacific region, expand the reaches of its state-driven economic model, and reorder the region in its favor. Russia seeks to restore its great power status and establish spheres of influence near its borders. The intentions of both nations are not necessarily fixed. …
For decades, U.S. policy was rooted in the belief that support for China’s rise and for its integration into the post-war international order would liberalize China. Contrary to our hopes, China expanded its power at the expense of the sovereignty of others. China gathers and exploits data on an unrivaled scale and spreads features of its authoritarian system, including corruption and the use of surveillance. It is building the most capable and well-funded military in the world, after our own. Its nuclear arsenal is growing and diversifying. Part of China’s military modernization and economic expansion is due to its access to the U.S. innovation economy, including America’s world-class universities.
Russia aims to weaken U.S. influence in the world and divide us from our allies and partners. …
Renew America’s Competitive Advantages
Renew Capabilities
Military
Defense Industrial Base
…will work with industry partners to strengthen U.S. competitiveness in key technologies and manufacturing capabilities. …
Nuclear Forces
Space
… America’s newly re-established National Space Council, chaired by the Vice President, will review America’s long-range space goals and develop a strategy that integrates all space sectors to support innovation and American leadership in space.
Cyberspace
Intelligence
… To prevent the theft of sensitive and proprietary information and maintain supply chain integrity, the United States must increase our understanding of the economic policy priorities of our adversaries and improve our ability to detect and defeat their attempts to commit economic espionage. …
Diplomacy and Statecraft
Competitive Diplomacy
… Diplomacy is indispensable to identify and implement solutions to conflicts in unstable regions of the world short of military involvement. It helps to galvanize allies for action and marshal the collective resources of like-minded nations and organizations to address shared problems. Authoritarian states are eager to replace the United States where the United States withdraws our diplomats and closes our outposts. …
… Diplomats must identify opportunities for commerce and cooperation, and facilitate the cultural, educational, and people-to-people exchanges that create the networks of current and future political, civil society, and educational leaders who will extend a free and prosperous world.
Tools of Economic Diplomacy
… Economic tools?including sanctions, anti-money-laundering and anti-corruption measures, and enforcement actions?can be important parts of broader strategies to deter, coerce, and constrain adversaries. …
Information Statecraft
… China, for example, combines data and the use of AI to rate the loyal of its citizens to the state and uses these ratings to determine jobs and more. Jihadist…
Russia uses information operations as part of its offensive cyber efforts to influence public opinion across the globe. …
… Local voices are most compelling and effective in ideological competitions. We must amplify credible voices and partner with them to advance alternatives to violent and hateful messages. …

pp.37-42 PILLAR IV: ADVANCE AMERICAN INFLUENCE (“JULY 2017″)
… During the Cold War, a totalitarian threat from the Soviet Union motivated the free world to create coalitions in defense of liberty. Today’s challenges to free societies are just as serious, but more diverse. …
… The United States offers partnership to those who share our aspirations for freedom and prosperity. We lead by example. “The world has its eye upon America,” Alexander Hamilton once observed. “The noble struggle we have made in the cause of liberty, has occasioned a kind of revolution in human sentiment. …
Encourage Aspiring Partners
… China and Russia target their investments in the developing world to expand influence and gain competitive advantages against the United States. China is investing billions of dollars in infrastructure across the globe. Russia, too, projects its influence economically, through the control of key energy and other infrastructure throughout parts of Europe and Central Asia. …
… The United States will promote a development model that partners with countries that want progress, consistent with their culture, based on free market principles, fair and reciprocal trade, private sector activity, and rule of law. The United States will shift away from a reliance on assistance based on grants to approaches that attract private capital and catalyze private sector activity. …
Achieve Better Outcomes in Multilateral Forums
… Authoritarian actors have long recognized the power of multilateral bodies and have used them to advance their interests and limit the freedom of their own citizens. If the United States cedes leadership of these bodies to adversaries, opportunities to shape developments that are positive for the United States will be lost. All institutions are not equal, however. …
… The United Nations can help contribute to solving many of the complex problems in the world, but it must be reformed and recommit to its founding principles. We will require accountability and emphasize shared responsibility among members. If the United States is asked to provide a disproportionate level of support for an institution, we will expect a commensurate degree of influence over the direction and efforts of that institution. …
…  The United States will promote the free flow of data and protect its interests through active engagement in key organizations, such as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), the UN, and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
Champion American Values
… America’s core principles, enshrined in the Declaration of Independence, are secured by the Bill of Rights, which proclaims our respect for fundamental individual liberties beginning with the freedoms of religion, speech, the press, and assembly. Liberty, free enterprise, equal justice under the law, and the dignity of every human life are central to who we are as a people. …
… We support, with our words and actions, those who live under oppressive regimes and who seek freedom, individual dignity, and the rule of law. We are under no obligation to offer the benefits of our free and prosperous community to repressive regimes and human rights abusers. We may use diplomacy, sanctions, and other tools to isolate states and leaders who threaten our interests and whose actions run contrary to our values. …

pp.45-53 THE STRATEGY IN A REGIONAL CONTEXT
Indo-Pacific
… Although the United States seeks to continue to cooperate with China… Its efforts to build and militarize outposts in the South China Sea endanger the free flow of trade, threaten the sovereignty of other nations, and undermine regional stability. China has mounted a rapid military modernization campaign designed to limit U.S. access to the region…
… Our alliance and friendship with South Korea, forged by the trials of history, is stronger than ever. We welcome and support the strong leadership role of our critical ally, Japan. Australia has fought alongside us in every significant conflict since World War I… New Zealand is a key U.S. partner contributing to peace and security across the region. We welcome India’s emergence as a leading global power and stronger strategic and defense partner. We will seek to increase quadrilateral cooperation with Japan, Australia, and India.
In Southeast Asia, the Philippines and Thailand remain important allies and markets for Americans. Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore are growing security and economic partners of the United States. …
… We will work with allies and partners to achieve complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula and preserve the non-proliferation regime in Northeast Asia.
…we will cooperate on missile defense with Japan and South Korea to move toward an area defense capability. We remain ready to respond with overwhelming force to North Korean aggression and will improve options to compel denuclearization of the peninsula. We will improve law enforcement, defense, and intelligence cooperation with Southeast Asian partners to address the growing terrorist threat. We will maintain our strong ties with Taiwan in accordance with our “One China” policy…
Europe
… Russia is using subversive measures to weaken the credibility of America’s commitment to Europe, undermine transatlantic unity, and weaken European institutions and governments. With its invasions of Georgia and Ukraine…
China is gaining a strategic foothold in Europe by expanding its unfair trade practices and investing in key industries, sensitive technologies, and infrastructure. Europe also faces immediate threats from violent Islamist extremists. Attacks by ISIS and other jihadist…
… We will encourage European foreign direct investment in the United States to create jobs. We will work with our allies and partners to diversify European energy sources to ensure the energy security of European countries. We will work with our partners to contest China’s unfair trade and economic practices and restrict its acquisition of sensitive technologies.
… We expect our European allies to increase defense spending to 2 percent of gross domestic product by 2024, with 20 percent of this spending devoted to increasing military capabilities. …
Middle East
… For generations the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has been understood as the prime irritant preventing peace and prosperity in the region. Today, the threats from jihadist terrorist organizations and the threat from Iran are creating the realization that Israel is not the cause of the region’s problems. States have increasingly found common interests with Israel in confronting common threats. …
… We remain committed to helping our partners achieve a stable and prosperous region, including through a strong and integrated Gulf Cooperation Council. We will strengthen our long-term strategic partnership with Iraq as an independent state. We will seek a settlement to the Syrian civil war that sets the conditions for refugees to return home and rebuild their lives in safety. … We remain committed to helping facilitate a comprehensive peace agreement that is acceptable to both Israelis and Palestinians. …
South and Central Asia
… We will help South Asian nations maintain their sovereign as China increases its influence in the region. …
Western Hemisphere
Stable, friendly, and prosperous states in the Western Hemisphere enhance our security and benefit our economy. Democratic states connected by shared values and economic interests will reduce the violence, drug trafficking, and illegal immigration that threaten our common security…
… Transnational criminal organizations—including gangs and cartels—perpetuate violence and corruption, and threaten the stability of Central American states including Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. In Venezuela and Cuba, governments cling to anachronistic leftist authoritarian models that continue to fail their people. Competitors have found operating space in the hemisphere.
China seeks to pull the region into its orbit through state-led investments and loans. Russia continues its failed politics of the Cold War by bolstering its radical Cuban allies as Cuba continues to repress its citizens. Both China and Russia support the dictatorship in Venezuela and are seeking to expand military linkages and arms sales across the region. …
Africa
… China is expanding its economic and military presence in Africa, growing from a small investor in the continent two decades ago into Africa’s largest trading partner today. Some Chinese practices undermine Africa’s long-term development by corrupting elites, dominating extractive industries, and locking countries into unsustainable and opaque debts and commitments. …
… We will offer American goods and services, both because it is profitable for us and because it serves as an alternative to China’s often extractive economic footprint on the continent. …

p.55 CONCLUSION
… It is realist because it acknowledges the central role of power in international politics, affirms that sovereign states are the best hope for a peaceful world, and clearly defines our national interests. It is principled because it is grounded in the knowledge that advancing American principles spreads peace and prosperity around the globe. We are guided by our values and disciplined by our interests. …


Crisis Management Vol.3 (Maria, Irma, Harvey; Puerto Rico, et al.)


Crisis Management Vol.2 (Hurricanes)

All the below were retweeted by @wsi_usa.


https://twitter.com/DailySignal/status/902631908575731719


Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.28

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.


Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.27

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.


Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.26

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.