Austria Vol.1 (Miscellaneous incl Presidential Election 2016)

Austrian Presidential Election Map 2016

The Borsen-Kurier of Vienna about Free Territory and Free Port of Trieste | @TriesteLibera

UK Vol.109 (Post-EUref #Brexit Vol.33)

Indiana Vol.7

State of Indiana
City of Indianapolis
City of Fort Wayne Departments
City of Evansville & County of Vanderburgh
City of South Bend Departments
@IndyChamber News
Indiana State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) @ISDAgov ABOUT INDIANA AGRICULTURE
Indiana Farm Bureau @INFarmBureau Indiana Farm Bureau In the News
@INCornFarmers Indiana Corn Marketing Council & Indiana Corn Growers Association
Indiana Soybean Alliance @INSoybean NEWS & MEDIA
Indiana Pork Farmers @IndianaPork Useful Pork Resources
Indiana Beef Cattle Association & Indiana Beef Council @INBeef
American Dairy Association Indiana @INDairy Winners Drink Milk Blog
Hoosier Ag Today @hoosieragtoday
Purdue Agriculture @PurdueAg News & Featured Stories
@PurdueAgronomy Research Facilities
Purdue’s Department of Agricultural Economics @PurdueAgEcon
Purdue Agricultural Research and Graduate Education @AgResearchPU
@KelleyIndy Kelley Indianapolis Hub PODCAST
Inside INdiana Business @IIB
Tale of two Rust Belts: Higher education is driving Rust Belt revival but risks abound (12/20/2017) | John C. Austin @BrookingsInst

Indiana Vol.4

New Mexico Vol.4

State of New Mexico citizen
City of Albuquerque Department Listing
@abqchamber blog
City of Las Cruces news
City of Rio Rancho GOVERNMENT
City of Santa Fe TOURISM Santa Fe

New Mexico Vol.3

Georgia Vol.3

State of Georgia Industries @gdecd
@ExploreGeorgia Regions & Cities
Georgia’s Top 100 Public Companies (09/2016) | @GeorgiaTrend
@TAGthink State of the Industry Report
Aerospace (PDF)
@GAagribusiness website
Georgia Council for the Arts
Georgia Automotive Manufacturers Association, Inc.
Deal announces launch of Georgia Defense Exchange
@GeorgiaTech Energy and Sustainable Infrastructure
Economic Contributions of the Georgia Film and Television Industry (PDF; 02/28/2011) | Meyers Norris Penny
@fintechatlanta Resources
The Food Processing Industry in Georgia (PDF) | @universityofga
@Georgia_Bio news
Georgia: A Thriving Supply Chain Hub (11/08/2011) | Governor Nathan Deal @TIDRoundup
Georgia Association of Manufacturers
The Commercial Music Industry in Atlanta and the State of Georgia – An Economic Impact Study (PDF) | @GeorgiaStateU Fiscal Research Center
City of Atlanta Departments
Five reasons Atlanta is the new hotbed for digital entertainment (04/07/2015) | @ajc
City of Augusta Departments
City of Savannah Department Directory

Georgia Vol.2

Iowa Vol.2

City of Des Moines
City of Cedar Rapids
City of Davenport
Sioux City
Iowa Chamber of Commerce Executives news
Iowa Chamber Alliance Policy Issues

US Policy Changes Vol.78 (Global politics, Nuclear deterrence, Economic inequality, Mobility, et al.)

Great stuff!

An Outlook on Global Politics 2018 (w PDF; 01/23/2018) | Nicholas Burns @BelferCenter

Who’s Afraid of a Balance of Power? (12/08/2017) | Stephen M. Walt @ForeignPolicy

The European trust crisis and the rise of populism (w PDFs; 09/07/2017) | Yann Algan, Sergei Guriev, Elias Papaioannou, and Evgenia Passari @BrookingsInst

A post-American Europe and the future of U.S. strategy (w PDF; December 2017) | Thomas Wright @BrookingsInst

America is on the brink of a historic break with Europe, thanks to Trump (12/26/2016) | Nicholas Burns @USAToday

How to read the 2018 National Defense Strategy (01/21/2018) | Mara Karlin @BrookingsInst

Brookings experts on Trump’s National Security Strategy (12/21/2017) | @BrookingsInst

Crafting Trump’s first National Security Strategy: What it could be?and why it might not matter anyway (09/13/2017) | Tarun Chhabra @BrookingsInst

Former Commander: Here’s What Happens When the President Orders a Nuclear Strike (w Video; 08/11/2017) | James Winnefeld @Fortune

The New Era of Counterforce: Technological Change and the Future of Nuclear Deterrence (w PDF; Spring 2017) | Keir A. Lieber & Daryl Press @Journal_IS

Nuclear Deterrence in the Computer Age: The Erosion of Stalemate (w PDF; 05/16/2017) | Keir A. Lieber & Daryl Press @Journal_IS

The 1967 War (Podcast; 06/02/2017) | Khaled Elgindy, Shadi Hamid, Martin S. Indyk, Natan Sachs, Tamara Cofman Wittes, and Fred Dews @BrookingsInst

Twelve economic facts on energy and climate change: A joint report from The Hamilton Project and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (w PDF; 03/27/2017)

A Time to Repair the Roof: A Speech by International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde (w Transcript & Video; 10/05/2017) | (Nicholas Burns, Lawrence Summers) @futurediplomacy

Charles Murray on Culture vs. Economics – From the book “This Way Up” | @AEI

Teaching about economic inequality is political, but not the way you think (12/06/2017) | Joel Westheimer and John Rogers @BrookingsInst

The Copenhagen City and Port Development Corporation: A model for regenerating cities (w PDF; 06/01/2017) | Bruce Katz and Luise Noring @BrookingsInst

The future of mobility: Why your new car is like an electronic typewriter (01/17/2018) | Wolfgang Fengler @BrookingsInst

Gauging investment in self-driving cars (w Excel; 10/16/2017) | Cameron F. Kerry and Jack Karsten

It’s Energy Week: Here are 10 lessons about buying or leasing an electric car (06/27/2017) | Timmons Roberts

Eleven facts about innovation and patents (w PDF; 12/13/2017) | Jay Shambaugh, Ryan Nunn, and Becca Portman @BrookingsInst

2017 Annual Report | @AEI

Michigan Vol.3

State of Michigan Departments
City of Detroit Departments and Agencies
City of Grand Rapids Departments
City of Warren
City of Sterling Heights Economic Development – Business Resources
City of Ann Arbor Departments

Michigan Vol.2

Connecticut Vol.3

Texas Vol.6

Texas Vol.4

Utah Vol.3

Pennsylvania Vol.2

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.32

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.29

@wsi_usa’s RTs.

US Policy Changes Vol.74 (National Security Strategy)

The below excerpt of National Security Strategy of the United States of America DECEMBER 2017 (PDF) is on our own.

The American people elected me to make America great again. …
During my first year in office, you have witnessed my America First foreign policy in action. …
The United States faces an extraordinarily dangerous world, filled with a wide range of threats that have intensified in recent years. …
We are rallying the world against the rogue regime in North Korea and confronting the danger posed by the dictatorship in Iran, which those determined to pursue a flawed nuclear deal had neglected. …
At home, we have restored confidence in America’s purpose. …
The whole world is lifted by America’s renewal and the reemergence of American leadership. …

… Putting America first is the duty of our government and the foundation for U.S. leadership in the world.
A strong America is in the vital interests of not only the American people, but also those around the world who want to partner with the United States in pursuit of shared interests, values, and aspirations.
… Liberty and independence have given us the flourishing society Americans enjoy today-a vibrant and confident Nation, welcoming of disagreement and differences, but united by the bonds of history, culture, beliefs, and principles that define who we are.
… American political, business, and military leaders worked together with their counterparts in Europe and Asia to shape the post-war order through the United Nations, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and other institutions designed to advance our shared interests of security, freedom, and peace. …
A Competitive World
… China and Russia challenge American power, influence, and interests, attempting to erode American security and prosperity. …
…jihadist terrorists such as ISIS and al-Qa’ida continue to spread a barbaric ideology that calls for the violent destruction of governments and innocents they consider to be apostates. …
… North Korea-a country that starves its own people-has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons that could threaten our homeland. …
An America First National Security Strategy
First, our fundamental responsibility is to protect the American people, the homeland, and the American way of life.
Second, we will promote American prosperity. …
Third, we will preserve peace through strength by rebuilding our military so that it remains preeminent, deters our adversaries, and if necessary, is able to fight and win. …
Fourth, we will advance American influence because a world that supports American interests and reflects our values makes America more secure and prosperous. …

… North Korea seeks the capability to kill millions of Americans with nuclear weapons. … Non-state actors undermine social order through drug and human trafficking networks…
Secure U.S. Borders and Territory
Defend Against Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)
…deploying a layered missile defense system focused on North Korea and Iran to defend… Enhanced missile defense is not intended to undermine strategic stability or disrupt longstanding strategic relationships with Russia or China. …
Combat Biothreats and Pandemics
Strengthen Border Control and Immigration Policy
Pursue Threats to Their Source
Defeat Jihadist Terrorists
Dismantle Transnational Criminal Organizations
Keep America Safe in the Cyber Era
…assess risk across six key areas: national security, energy and power, banking and finance, health and safety, communications, and transportation. …
Promote American Resilience

… Working with our allies and partners, the United States led the creation of a group of financial institutions and other economic forums that established equitable rules and built instruments to stabilize the international economy and remove the points of friction that had contributed to two world wars. …
… Experience shows that these countries distorted and undermined key economic institutions without undertaking significant reform of their economies or politics. They espouse free trade rhetoric and exploit its benefits, but only adhere selectively to the rules and agreements. …
Rejuvenate the Domestic Economy
… Departments and agencies will eliminate unnecessary regulations that stifle growth, drive up costs for American businesses, impede research and development, discourage hiring, and incentivize domestic businesses to move overseas. …
… Federal, state, and local governments will work together with private industry to improve our airports, seaports and waterways, roads and railways, transit systems, and telecommunications. …
Promote Free, Fair, and Reciprocal Economic Relationships
…will pursue bilateral trade and investment agreements with countries that commit to fair and reciprocal trade and will modernize existing agreements to ensure they are consistent with those principles. …
Lead in Research, Technology, Invention, and Innovation
… The Department of Defense and other agencies will establish strategic partnerships with U.S. companies to help align private sector R&D resources to priority national security applications. …
Promote and Protect the U.S. National Security Innovation Base
…will reduce the illicit appropriation of U.S. public and private sector technology and technical knowledge by hostile foreign competitors. …
…will review visa procedures to reduce economic theft by non-traditional intelligence collectors. …
Embrace Energy Dominance
…will streamline the Federal regulatory approval processes for energy infrastructure, from pipeline and export terminals to container shipments and gathering lines, while also ensuring responsible environmental stewardship.

… Three main sets of challengers-the revisionist powers of China and Russia, the rogue states of Iran and North Korea, and transnational threat organizations, particularly jihadist terrorist groups-are actively competing against the United States and our allies and partners. …
… China and Russia want to shape a world antithetical to U.S. values and interests. China seeks to displace the United States in the Indo-Pacific region, expand the reaches of its state-driven economic model, and reorder the region in its favor. Russia seeks to restore its great power status and establish spheres of influence near its borders. The intentions of both nations are not necessarily fixed. …
For decades, U.S. policy was rooted in the belief that support for China’s rise and for its integration into the post-war international order would liberalize China. Contrary to our hopes, China expanded its power at the expense of the sovereignty of others. China gathers and exploits data on an unrivaled scale and spreads features of its authoritarian system, including corruption and the use of surveillance. It is building the most capable and well-funded military in the world, after our own. Its nuclear arsenal is growing and diversifying. Part of China’s military modernization and economic expansion is due to its access to the U.S. innovation economy, including America’s world-class universities.
Russia aims to weaken U.S. influence in the world and divide us from our allies and partners. …
Renew America’s Competitive Advantages
Renew Capabilities
Defense Industrial Base
…will work with industry partners to strengthen U.S. competitiveness in key technologies and manufacturing capabilities. …
Nuclear Forces
… America’s newly re-established National Space Council, chaired by the Vice President, will review America’s long-range space goals and develop a strategy that integrates all space sectors to support innovation and American leadership in space.
… To prevent the theft of sensitive and proprietary information and maintain supply chain integrity, the United States must increase our understanding of the economic policy priorities of our adversaries and improve our ability to detect and defeat their attempts to commit economic espionage. …
Diplomacy and Statecraft
Competitive Diplomacy
… Diplomacy is indispensable to identify and implement solutions to conflicts in unstable regions of the world short of military involvement. It helps to galvanize allies for action and marshal the collective resources of like-minded nations and organizations to address shared problems. Authoritarian states are eager to replace the United States where the United States withdraws our diplomats and closes our outposts. …
… Diplomats must identify opportunities for commerce and cooperation, and facilitate the cultural, educational, and people-to-people exchanges that create the networks of current and future political, civil society, and educational leaders who will extend a free and prosperous world.
Tools of Economic Diplomacy
… Economic tools?including sanctions, anti-money-laundering and anti-corruption measures, and enforcement actions?can be important parts of broader strategies to deter, coerce, and constrain adversaries. …
Information Statecraft
… China, for example, combines data and the use of AI to rate the loyal of its citizens to the state and uses these ratings to determine jobs and more. Jihadist…
Russia uses information operations as part of its offensive cyber efforts to influence public opinion across the globe. …
… Local voices are most compelling and effective in ideological competitions. We must amplify credible voices and partner with them to advance alternatives to violent and hateful messages. …

… During the Cold War, a totalitarian threat from the Soviet Union motivated the free world to create coalitions in defense of liberty. Today’s challenges to free societies are just as serious, but more diverse. …
… The United States offers partnership to those who share our aspirations for freedom and prosperity. We lead by example. “The world has its eye upon America,” Alexander Hamilton once observed. “The noble struggle we have made in the cause of liberty, has occasioned a kind of revolution in human sentiment. …
Encourage Aspiring Partners
… China and Russia target their investments in the developing world to expand influence and gain competitive advantages against the United States. China is investing billions of dollars in infrastructure across the globe. Russia, too, projects its influence economically, through the control of key energy and other infrastructure throughout parts of Europe and Central Asia. …
… The United States will promote a development model that partners with countries that want progress, consistent with their culture, based on free market principles, fair and reciprocal trade, private sector activity, and rule of law. The United States will shift away from a reliance on assistance based on grants to approaches that attract private capital and catalyze private sector activity. …
Achieve Better Outcomes in Multilateral Forums
… Authoritarian actors have long recognized the power of multilateral bodies and have used them to advance their interests and limit the freedom of their own citizens. If the United States cedes leadership of these bodies to adversaries, opportunities to shape developments that are positive for the United States will be lost. All institutions are not equal, however. …
… The United Nations can help contribute to solving many of the complex problems in the world, but it must be reformed and recommit to its founding principles. We will require accountability and emphasize shared responsibility among members. If the United States is asked to provide a disproportionate level of support for an institution, we will expect a commensurate degree of influence over the direction and efforts of that institution. …
…  The United States will promote the free flow of data and protect its interests through active engagement in key organizations, such as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), the UN, and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
Champion American Values
… America’s core principles, enshrined in the Declaration of Independence, are secured by the Bill of Rights, which proclaims our respect for fundamental individual liberties beginning with the freedoms of religion, speech, the press, and assembly. Liberty, free enterprise, equal justice under the law, and the dignity of every human life are central to who we are as a people. …
… We support, with our words and actions, those who live under oppressive regimes and who seek freedom, individual dignity, and the rule of law. We are under no obligation to offer the benefits of our free and prosperous community to repressive regimes and human rights abusers. We may use diplomacy, sanctions, and other tools to isolate states and leaders who threaten our interests and whose actions run contrary to our values. …

… Although the United States seeks to continue to cooperate with China… Its efforts to build and militarize outposts in the South China Sea endanger the free flow of trade, threaten the sovereignty of other nations, and undermine regional stability. China has mounted a rapid military modernization campaign designed to limit U.S. access to the region…
… Our alliance and friendship with South Korea, forged by the trials of history, is stronger than ever. We welcome and support the strong leadership role of our critical ally, Japan. Australia has fought alongside us in every significant conflict since World War I… New Zealand is a key U.S. partner contributing to peace and security across the region. We welcome India’s emergence as a leading global power and stronger strategic and defense partner. We will seek to increase quadrilateral cooperation with Japan, Australia, and India.
In Southeast Asia, the Philippines and Thailand remain important allies and markets for Americans. Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore are growing security and economic partners of the United States. …
… We will work with allies and partners to achieve complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula and preserve the non-proliferation regime in Northeast Asia.
…we will cooperate on missile defense with Japan and South Korea to move toward an area defense capability. We remain ready to respond with overwhelming force to North Korean aggression and will improve options to compel denuclearization of the peninsula. We will improve law enforcement, defense, and intelligence cooperation with Southeast Asian partners to address the growing terrorist threat. We will maintain our strong ties with Taiwan in accordance with our “One China” policy…
… Russia is using subversive measures to weaken the credibility of America’s commitment to Europe, undermine transatlantic unity, and weaken European institutions and governments. With its invasions of Georgia and Ukraine…
China is gaining a strategic foothold in Europe by expanding its unfair trade practices and investing in key industries, sensitive technologies, and infrastructure. Europe also faces immediate threats from violent Islamist extremists. Attacks by ISIS and other jihadist…
… We will encourage European foreign direct investment in the United States to create jobs. We will work with our allies and partners to diversify European energy sources to ensure the energy security of European countries. We will work with our partners to contest China’s unfair trade and economic practices and restrict its acquisition of sensitive technologies.
… We expect our European allies to increase defense spending to 2 percent of gross domestic product by 2024, with 20 percent of this spending devoted to increasing military capabilities. …
Middle East
… For generations the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has been understood as the prime irritant preventing peace and prosperity in the region. Today, the threats from jihadist terrorist organizations and the threat from Iran are creating the realization that Israel is not the cause of the region’s problems. States have increasingly found common interests with Israel in confronting common threats. …
… We remain committed to helping our partners achieve a stable and prosperous region, including through a strong and integrated Gulf Cooperation Council. We will strengthen our long-term strategic partnership with Iraq as an independent state. We will seek a settlement to the Syrian civil war that sets the conditions for refugees to return home and rebuild their lives in safety. … We remain committed to helping facilitate a comprehensive peace agreement that is acceptable to both Israelis and Palestinians. …
South and Central Asia
… We will help South Asian nations maintain their sovereign as China increases its influence in the region. …
Western Hemisphere
Stable, friendly, and prosperous states in the Western Hemisphere enhance our security and benefit our economy. Democratic states connected by shared values and economic interests will reduce the violence, drug trafficking, and illegal immigration that threaten our common security…
… Transnational criminal organizations—including gangs and cartels—perpetuate violence and corruption, and threaten the stability of Central American states including Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. In Venezuela and Cuba, governments cling to anachronistic leftist authoritarian models that continue to fail their people. Competitors have found operating space in the hemisphere.
China seeks to pull the region into its orbit through state-led investments and loans. Russia continues its failed politics of the Cold War by bolstering its radical Cuban allies as Cuba continues to repress its citizens. Both China and Russia support the dictatorship in Venezuela and are seeking to expand military linkages and arms sales across the region. …
… China is expanding its economic and military presence in Africa, growing from a small investor in the continent two decades ago into Africa’s largest trading partner today. Some Chinese practices undermine Africa’s long-term development by corrupting elites, dominating extractive industries, and locking countries into unsustainable and opaque debts and commitments. …
… We will offer American goods and services, both because it is profitable for us and because it serves as an alternative to China’s often extractive economic footprint on the continent. …

… It is realist because it acknowledges the central role of power in international politics, affirms that sovereign states are the best hope for a peaceful world, and clearly defines our national interests. It is principled because it is grounded in the knowledge that advancing American principles spreads peace and prosperity around the globe. We are guided by our values and disciplined by our interests. …

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.27

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.25

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.

UK Vol.107 (Wales Vol.6)

UK Wales southwalesargus
UK Wales CreativeCardiff

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.24

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.

Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.23

Here are tweets of great stuff retweeted by @_WorldSolutions.

US Policy Changes Vol.73 (US business school professors Vol.6)

Here is a part of U.S. business schools’ tweets on economic/social/technological issues in which their professors/alumni are featured, quoted, et al. (mainly those from September to November 2017). Great stuff!
[We don’t have affiliations with these schools or people.]

US Policy Changes Vol.72 (US business school professors Vol.5)

Here is a part of U.S. business schools’ tweets on economic/social/technological issues in which their professors/alumni are featured, quoted, et al. (mainly those from September to November 2017). Great stuff!
[We don’t have affiliations with these schools or people.]

US Policy Changes Vol.70 (US business school professors Vol.3)

Here is a part of U.S. business schools’ tweets on economic/social/technological issues in which their professors/alumni are featured, quoted, et al. (mainly those from September to November 2017). Great stuff!
[We don’t have affiliations with these schools or people.]

US Policy Changes Vol.69 (US business school professors Vol.2)

Here is a part of U.S. business schools’ tweets on economic/social/technological issues in which their professors are featured, quoted, et al. (mainly those from September to November 2017). Great stuff!
[We don’t have affiliations with these schools or professors.]

US Policy Changes Vol.68 (US business school professors Vol.1)

Here is a part of U.S. business schools’ tweets on economic/social/technological issues in which their professors are featured, quoted, et al. (mainly those from September to November 2017). Great stuff!
[We don’t have affiliations with these schools or professors.]