Ireland Vol.51 (universities, etc.)


Ireland Vol.50 (Brexit: electricity, customs, etc.)

Brexit Delays Leave UK Facing Risk of Higher Power Prices (03/26/2019) | @business
NIAUR Northern Ireland Authority for Utility Reg : Electricity and Gas trading arrangements in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit (03/11/2019) | @Market_Screener
North-south interconnector decision ‘failed to consider Brexit’ (07/18/2017) | @IrishTimes
Energy Ireland conference focuses on looking beyond 2020 (07/04/2017) | @EngineerIreland
The Impact of Brexit on the EU energy system (PDF; 2017) | @Europarl_EN
ESB posts £13m loss for gas-fired power plant in Londonderry (07/02/2019) | @BelTel
Varadkar rules out offering ESB a second bite at broadband roll-out (05/03/2019) | @irishexaminer
Sterling to slump in no-deal Brexit, ESB’s power plants and INM’s shares soar (04/05/2019) | @IrishTimes
ESB out to triple UK customers to 100,000 (03/22/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Electricity bills could rise if Brexit threatens Ireland’s unique energy agreement (11/30/2018) | @irishexaminer
Ireland’s ESB to launch UK energy supplier this year (08/11/2017) | @reuters
Irish firm wins €30m customer services contract with Electric Ireland (21/06/2019) | @NewstalkFM
France and Ireland tap up EU for €667m to build power link (05/29/2019) | @eaEnergyEU
How will the UK trade electricity if there’s a no-deal Brexit? (26/03/2019) | NS Energy
The Future of the All-island Single Electricity Market Post-Brexit (02/22/2019) | @DCU_Brexit_Inst
Keeping the Lights on After Brexit: No-Deal’s Impact on Energy (02/21/2019) | @bpolitics
Irish energy industry calls for new links to Europe amid Brexit fears (12/02/2019) | @ClimateHome
Brexit is just one of the challenges facing the Irish electricity market (01/27/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Brexit could end cross-border electricity supply, British Government warns (10/12/2018) | @IrishTimes
No-deal Brexit could result in Northern Ireland blackouts, leaks reveal (27/09/2018) | @guardian
An electric fence? Assessing the impact of Brexit on the Single Electricity Market in Ireland (09/08/2018) | @LSEEuroppblog
Brexit: Government plan for electricity barges in Irish sea should Northern Ireland be cut off (07/12/2018) | @BelTel
The impact of Brexit on the Irish energy system – pragmatism vs. principles (11/21/2017) | @Bruegel_org
Brexit, Electricity and the No-Deal Scenario: Perspectives from Continental Europe, Ireland and the UK (w PDF; 10/2018) | @IFRI_
ALPS Electric Limited celebrates 30th Anniversary in Millstreet, Co. Cork (26/11/2018) | @IDAIreland
Re-evaluating Irish energy policy in light of Brexit (PDF; 06/2017) | @EsriIreland
What does Brexit Mean for the Energy Sector in Ireland? (PDF; 2016) | @iiea
Trading electricity if there’s no Brexit deal (25/03/2019) | @GOVUK
Brexit: energy security – Chapter 8: The island of Ireland | @UKParliament

Dublin and Brussels ‘in secret talks about new customs checks and controls at ports and factories’ as no-deal likelihood grows (22/08/2019) | @Telegraph
Republic of Ireland to begin Brexit customs checks and controls away from border (08/22/2019) | @BelTel
New Government initiative to help customs capacity post-Brexit (08/07/2019) | @SkillnetIreland
Ireland scrambles to help firms with Brexit customs burden (08/07/2019) | @reuters
Brexit: why customs are central to solving the Irish border impasse (01/30/2019) | @UCDLawSchool,@ConversationEDU
Revenue preparing for full customs checks post-Brexit (09/06/2018) | @IrishTimes
UK officials float third way Brexit customs compromise (06/05/2018) | @POLITICOEurope
Brexit special – your customs checklist! (PDF) | @Deloitte
Brexit | @CharteredAccIrl
Brexit | @RevenueIE
New Government initiative to help customs capacity post-Brexit (07/08/2019) | gov.ie
Post-Brexit border options for customs | @agendani
Import Customs Procedures EU (RoI) | McMahon Legal (Solicitors)

Irish backstop explained: what does it mean for Brexit, and why is the Irish border so important? (22/08/2019) | @Telegraph
Brexiteers Bear All the Blame for the Irish Border Impasse (08/22/2019) | @ForeignPolicy
Boris Johnson should call the DUP’s bluff and create a border in the Irish Sea (22/08/2019) | @guardian
What a No-Deal Brexit Would Mean for the Irish Border (08/22/2019) | @washingtonpost
Brexit Held at the Border (08/22/2019) | @NRO
Why smuggling across the border could worsen after Brexit (20/08/2019) | @rte
In Northern Ireland, Young People Worry Bloody History Could Return After Brexit (08/21/2019) | @WSJ
In Northern Ireland, There’s No Such Thing as a ‘Good Brexit’ (08/13/2019) | @WPReview
Don’t Blame Boris for the Brexit Backstop Impasse (08/09/2019) | @ForeignPolicy
Why the Brexit Backstop is so important for Northern Ireland and Britain (YouTube; 08/21/2019) | @dwnews
Brexit: what is the Irish backstop and why does Boris Johnson want it ditched? (26/07/2019) | @euronews
Brexit’s Stickiest Point: The Irish Backstop (03/19/2019) | @CFR_org


Ireland Vol.49 (Brexit: tourism, port, airport, etc.)

Get Brexit Ready | @Failte_Ireland
Get Brexit Ready | @Failte_Ireland & @CroweIreland
Brexit and the Irish Tourism Sector | @CroweIreland
Failte Ireland says a hard Brexit could cost €380m | @marketing_ie
Failte Ireland Announces €5 Million Fund To Support Tourism In Advance Of Brexit. (01/18/2019) | @kfmradio
Failte Ireland predicts tourism growth of up to 5pc next year despite concerns over Brexit (11/13/2018) | @IndoBusiness
Tourism officials want to know how to attract more wealthy jet-setters (09/12/2017) | @Fora_ie
BREXIT: Failte Ireland helps Cork tourism businesses with Brexit problems (12/10/2017) | @TheCork_ie
Implications of Brexit for Tourism Sector: Failte Ireland and Tourism Ireland (07/11/2018) | @OireachtasNews
New strategy unveiled to grow tourism from GB (NI version) (06/06/2019) | @TourismIreland
Brexit | @NITouristBoard
Tourism Ireland spending €7m to reassure UK citizens Ireland ‘is still open for business’ (07/15/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Tourism Ireland warns hard Brexit could cost industry €390m a year (07/15/2019) | @IrishTimes
Northern Ireland tourism more vulnerable to Brexit due to British market reliance (11/29/2018) | @irish_news
Tourism industry ready for a Brexit battle as UK visitor numbers fall (31/07/2019) | @SouthernStarIRL
Ireland’s tourism chief talks U.S. visitor growth, VAT, Brexit (02/01/2019) | @travelweekly
Fears Brexit and VAT hikes will have major impact on Irish tourism (28/12/2018) | @IrishMirror
Ireland Releases ‘Sobering’ Contingency Plan for No-Deal Brexit (21/12/2018) | @nytimes
New Research Quantifies Brexit Impact on Irish Exports and Tourism From Changing UK Consumer Behaviour (04/12/2018) | @IoDIreland
How Brexit Could Affect Irish Tourism (12/05/2016) | @AIBIreland

Dublin Port Company reaches agreement over site it requires to deal with impact of Brexit (09/08/2019) | @breakingnewsie
Dublin Port Company settles High Court action over site required to deal with Brexit impact (08/09/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Dublin Port takes action over site required for Brexit preparations (07/08/2019) | @rte
‘Mayhem will ensue!’ Ireland panics over no-deal Brexit – ‘Ports not ready’ (07/08/2019) | @Daily_Express
U.K. Seeks Brexit Concessions, Saying Dublin Has the Most to Lose (07/10/2019) | @bpolitics
Dublin Port overhaul to prepare for Brexit (07/10/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Arlene Foster fears Brexit works at Dublin Port ‘damaging’ to Belfast cruise industry (14/05/2019) | @irish_news
Irish shipping industry booming amid Brexit fears (01/04/2019) | @practicenet
Direct shipping of goods between Ireland, continental Europe on rise amid Brexit fears (03/30/2019) | @XHNews
‘No-deal’ Brexit extra ferry services launched (29/03/2019) | @France24
Irish shipping industry booming as boats bypass British ports amid Brexit fears (29/03/2019) | @IrishMirror
‘A waste of money’: Dublin port reluctantly prepares for Brexit (17/03/2019) | @guardian
Dublin Port Seeks to Take Back Leased Land Post-Brexit For Border Checks (03/12/2019) | @marsecreview
How is Dublin Port preparing for a no-deal Brexit (15/01/2019) | @safety4sea
How is Dublin preparing for a possible no-deal Brexit? (12/01/2019) | @BBC
‘This is the border’: Dublin Port, Ireland’s ground zero for Brexit (01/18/2019) | @IrishTimes
Department only sought Dublin Port’s hard Brexit plan last month (12/24/2018) | @IrishTimes
France preparing additional sea ports for Irish freight traffic after Brexit (23/11/2018) | @FranceIrelandCh
‘Our work is on the assumption something awful happens’ – Dublin Port has plans for a ‘hard Brexit’ (07/19/2018) | @Fora_ie
Brexit burns Ireland’s British bridge to EU markets (07/20/2017) | @POLITICOPro
Other EU countries’ preparations for no deal (06/12/2019) | @instituteforgov
Ports across Ireland’s Brexit divide reaffirm unity on UN project (12/04/2018) | @UNCTAD
Discussion Paper on the ‘Impact of Brexit on the UK & Irish Port and Transit Sector (PDF; 04/2019) | @BrIreCham
European ports brace for Brexit (PDF; 06/05/2019) | @ESPOSecretariat
The impact of BREXIT on Dublin Port (PDF; 20/02/2018) | @Europarl_EN,@DublinPortCo
The Implications Of Brexit On The Use Of The Landbridge (PDF) | @IMDOIreland
Customs Brexit Information Seminar (PDF) | @RevenueIE
Preparing for the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union – Contingency Action Plan Update (PDF; 07/2019) | @dfatirl
Preparing for the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 29 March 2019 – Contingency Action Plan (PDF; 12/2018) | @dfatirl

daa Extremely Concerned At Aviation Regulator’s Proposed Charges (05/09/2019) | @DublinAirport
daa Delivers Record Profits As Passenger Numbers Increase (04/30/2019) | @daa
Daa plans €40m development spend for Cork Airport over next four years (04/30/2019) | @irishexaminer
What is No Deal Brexit? Nine ways Irish people will be affected if UK leaves EU with no deal (13/03/2019) | @IrishMirror
Ireland DF status quo report ‘concerning’, says TR lobby (27/02/2019) | @TheTRBusiness
DAA awards Dublin Airport north runway contract to Roadbridge and FCC (01/11/2018) | @Airport_Mag
One third of Irish planes could be grounded by a no-deal Brexit (10/19/2018) | @IrishTimes
Restoring duty-free between Ireland and the UK could bring a €45m post-Brexit boost (07/19/2018) | @Fora_ie
DAA Warns Brexit Will Spell Fewer Flights and Higher Prices To UK (06/08/2017) | @hospitality_irl
Brexit and the consequences for Irish Customs – DRAFT (PDF; 09/2016) | @RevenueIE

CIF: Delays in the south’s infrastructure projects threaten Irish economy (31/07/2019) | @breakingnewsie
Brexit and the Irish Construction Sector (PDF; 03/2019) | @CIF_Ireland,@PwCIreland
CIF: Dublin is taking too much of €6.1bn State spend on major projects (04/03/2017) | @irishexaminer


World Vol.4


Ireland Vol.48 (Brexit: organisations)

Teagasc Communications on Brexit | @teagasc
Teagasc Submission to the Joint Committee on Agriculture, Food and the Marine on the Impact of Brexit on Agriculture, Food and Fisheries. (PDF; 10/26/2018)
Brexit and Irish agri-food trade (01/12/2017) | @xAlan_Matthews
No-deal Brexit: Cereal prices expected to increase by 5% at the Irish farm gate (02/02/2019) | @AgrilandIreland
Teagasc Warns Potato Growers To Import Seed Ahead Of Brexit (12/18/2018) | @CheckoutIreland
Dr Kevin Hanrahan, Head of Rural Economy & Development Programme, Teagasc. Brexit: potential implications for Ireland’s rural economy. | @sruc
Brexit: A Sectoral Overview (PDF; 2017) | @IRLDeptPER,@IGEESIRL
Irish Agriculture: Economic Impact and Current Challenges (PDF; 2018) | @centralbank_ie

Brexit preparedness at food and drinks firms jumps to 93% while levels of stockholding double to 70% (26/06/2019) | @Bordbia
Irish more ‘Brexit ready’ than UK, according to Bord Bia (06/26/2019) | @irishexaminer
EU’s big food producers look to Middle East to reduce hard Brexit exposure (02/19/2019) | @TheNationalUAE
UK Loss Is Opportunity For Irish Farmer’s Gain, Bord Bia (10/18/2018) | @CheckoutIreland
Practical Advice and Support for Business | @dfatirl
Food supply chains very exposed to Brexit risks – Bord Bia (07/08/2018) | @farmersjournal
Bord Bia Warns Of Potential Brexit Issues For Exports (08/08/2018) | @hospitality_irl
Bord Bia report shows robust growth for Irish drinks exports, but worries over Brexit and labelling (10/01/2018) | @breakingnewsie
Bord Bia ramp up efforts to prepare for worst of Brexit (23/03/2017) | @thatsfarming
Irish exporters attend Bord Bia Brexit meeting (19/07/2016) | @DailyReporter

Brexit: The Imperatives for Irish Farmers and the Agri-Food Sector | @IFAmedia
€100m Brexit fund for beef farmers deemed inadequate by IFA (07/29/2019) | @irishexaminer
IFA Calls for Urgent Measures to Address EU Brexit Beef Crisis (19/07/2019) | @thecattlesite
Irish beef producers in line for £86m Brexit compensation (16/05/2019) | @FarmersWeekly
Watch: IFA President confronts Taoiseach in Cork over Brexit impact on farmers (05/01/2019) | @irishexaminer
Beef farmers need €100m to cover Brexit losses to date – IFA (11/04/2019) | @farmersjournal
EU has to protect Irish beef industry from tariffs – IFA chairman (03/13/2019) | @IrishTimes
Irish beef farmers could face Brexit Armageddon, warns IFA (01/10/2019) | @IrishTimes
Ireland steps up effort to shelter economy from no-deal Brexit (22/02/2019) | @guardian
Opening Statement by IFA President Joe Healy to the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Agriculture, Food & the Marine (PDF; 09/04/2019)
Brexit – The Farming Perspective (PDF) | @UCDFoodHealth,@IFAmedia

‘IFA scaremongering about milk isn’t a strategy’ (04/04/2019) | @AgrilandIreland
Northern Ireland faces prospect of no-deal Brexit ‘milk lake’ (04/04/2019) | @guardian
Milk agency bracing for Brexit ‘worst-case scenario’ (10/18/2018) | @irishexaminer
NMA Highlights Discounting as Threat to Sustainability of Specialist Fresh Milk (13/07/2018) | @thecattlesite
Towards a ‘Milk Wise 2025’ Strategy for Irish Produced Fresh Milk (PDF) | @IFAmedia
Annual Report & Accounts 2017 (PDF) | National Milk Agency

Survey shows firms increasingly confident about Irish food safety regulation (07/31/2019) | @foodsafetynews
Allergens And Labelling Major Concern For Irish Food Industry (07/29/2019) | @CheckoutIreland
Batches Of Fish Pies Recalled By FSAI Over Listeria Fears (07/29/2019) | @ExtraIRL
Consumers think food is safe but more ‘intelligence’ needed – FSAI (05/02/2019) | @farmersjournal
IRISH VETERINARIANS PREPARE FOR CHANGE TO MANAGE ANIMAL WELFARE AND FOOD SECURITY POST BREXIT (PDF; 23/11/2018) | @VeterinaryHQ
Here’s what Irish food businesses worry about the most when they’re preparing your food | @Herdotie

Getting Business Brexit Ready | @BordIascMhara
‘Fish don’t do borders’: Life on the Irish Sea after a hard Brexit (12/14/2018) | @IrishTimes
BIM: Seafood sector grew by 7.4% last year (06/30/2017) | @irishexaminer
Research for PECH Committee – Fisheries in Ireland (PDF; 09/17/2018) | @Europarl_EN

€22m research vessel wanted to help with Brexit’s impact on Ireland’s seas’ (04/24/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Ireland ‘should copy Scotland’ in managing marine territory (11/09/2018) | @IrishTimes
Brexit to hit Irish marine firms, report finds (06/18/2018) | @irishexaminer


Ireland Vol.47 (Brexit: organisations)

Brexit | @iiea
Brexit: A Status Report (Second Edition) | @iiea
The provision of financial services in Ireland and from Ireland after Brexit – Deputy Governor Ed Sibley (16/05/2018) | @centralbank_ie,@iiea
Modelling the medium to long term potential macroeconomic impact of Brexit on Ireland (PDF; 11/2016) | @ZBW_news,@EsriIreland

Financial Supports for Business | @dfatirl
Brexit | @Inter_Trade
‘Don’t leave it until the last minute’: Just 10% of businesses preparing for no-deal Brexit (08/05/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Cross-border trade now worth a record £6.1bn (23/01/2019) | @irish_news
Brexit | @ChambersIreland
CHAMBERS IRELAND WELCOMES BREXIT GUARANTEE OF ‘NO HARD BORDER’ | @InBUSINESSIre
Your crash course in… Ireland’s Summer Economic Statement (06/25/2019) | @Fora_ie

Brexit & Future Europe | @ibec_irl
Brexit: a guide for your business (PDF; 03/2018) | @accenture,@ibec_irl
UK, NI and Irish Retailers in Stark No Deal Brexit Warning (21/02/2019) | @Retail_Irl
Brexit | @FoodDrink_Irl
Brexit and the Irish Technology Sector (PDF) | @technology_irl
Ibec calls for ‘brave’ steps to protect business in Budget 2020 (10/07/2019) | @rte
The importance of Ibec’s new trade association for the forestry and timber industry @_FIIreland (11/01/2019) | @BandF
Andrew Marr on political dynamics driving Brexit (podcast) | @ibec_irl
Cheddar Type Cheeses – A Brexit Case Study (PDF) | @POLITICOEurope,@DairyIndustryIE
Brexit and the Irish drinks industry (PDF) | @ABFI_Ireland
Speech by Minister Simon Coveney Financial Services Ireland/IBEC Annual Dinner: ‘Ready for Brexit and Beyond’ (16/11/2017) | @merrionstreet
Ireland’s Thriving Pharma and Chemicals Producers Optimistic about Brexit (12/02/2017) | @CHEManager_EU
Ibec Groups Agree ‘Agri-food Must Be A Top Priority’ As Brexit Process Commences (03/30/2017) | @CheckoutIreland
IBEC WANTS BREXIT AID EXEMPTION FOR FOOD (01/16/2017) | @BrexitBorder
Irish businesses reeling after Brexit, impact on agri-food sector severe – new survey shows (08/02/2016) | @AgrilandIreland
Five Ways Brexit Could Devastate the South of Ireland | @IrelandB4UDie

IDA secures 13,500 jobs this year but warns ‘Ireland cannot be complacent about its competitiveness’ (06/20/2019) | @IndoBusiness
5,000 new jobs created in Ireland due to Brexit – IDA Ireland (15/03/2019) | @rte
For Indian start-ups, Ireland can be ‘gateway to Europe’ (02/20/2019) | @businessline
More than 55 Brexit-related investments were won by Ireland in 2018 (01/03/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Biotech manufacturing is Ireland’s ‘sweet spot’, IDA says (01/07/2019) | @BioPharmaReport
Preparing Irish Business for Brexit (PDF; 02/27/2018) | @IDAIreland,@OireachtasNews
Prepare for Brexit | Government of Ireland and @Entirl
Brexit-exposed firms get €74m funding boost (08/18/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Irish exporters need to invest more ahead of Brexit, warns Enterprise Ireland (05/30/2019) | @irishexaminer
Brexit could make ireland a ‘special friend’ to united-states, Irish ambassador says (11/20/2018) | @washingtonpost
Enterprise Ireland ‘Brexit SME Scorecard’ will help Irish companies self- asses their readiness for Brexit | @RDAaccountants

Brexit Supports for your Small Business | Local Enterprise Office
Prepare your business for Brexit with customs training (05/04/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Local Enterprise Offices now support more than 7,000 Irish SMEs (18/02/2019) | @siliconrepublic
Small businesses urged to avail of new Brexit supports (05/31/2017) | @irishexaminer
Brexit Implications for Local Authorities | Local Government Management Agency
Brexit | @TheHPRA

Preparing for tomorrow by funding research today – SFI Research Centres to get €230m in Government funding (09/05/2019) | @rte
How Brexit threatens Irish science’s cross-border collaboration (30/01/2019) | @nature
SFI Starting Investigator Research Grants for three UCD academics (15/01/2019) | @ucddublin
Trinity trio secure SFI-National Natural Chinese Science Foundation funding (28/06/2018) | @tcddublin
NUI Galway Business School academics awarded €1.1 million in SFI grant scheme (03/15/2018) | @galwayad
Brexit: Challenges, Opportunities and Strategy for Scientific Research (PDF; 08/06/2017) | @OireachtasNews


UK Vol.152 (think tanks)


https://twitter.com/soclibforum/status/1153684139465482242


Ireland Vol.46 (Brexit: finance, IT, pharmaceuticals)

Brexit Centre | @AIBIreland
Breaking Down Brexit: What could it mean for Business in Britain? | @AIBIreland
AIB warns that a hard Brexit could cost the lender up to €163m (01/03/2019) | @rte
Brexit freeze: AIB warns firms are putting growth plans on ice (02/11/2019) | @siliconrepublic
Most Irish SMEs have yet to begin Brexit planning: AIB (02/11/2019) | @reuters
Irish lender AIB raises dividend despite ‘major concern’ on Brexit (03/01/2019) | @FT
Quarter of Irish bank lending is to UK borrowers, raising fears of Brexit shock (12/08/2018) | @IndoBusiness
AIB chairman says Republic risks ‘car crash’ Brexit if no deal reached (07/20/2017) | @BelTel
Majority of small business owners believe Brexit ‘will have negative impact’ (03/01/2019) | @News_Letter
Shares of AIB and Bank of Ireland hammered as Brexit storm clouds darken (07/29/2019) | @irishexaminer
Your Business and Brexit | @bankofireland
Bank of Ireland launches €2bn Brexit Fund | @bankofireland
Bank of Ireland warns on Brexit hazard to institution (08/08/2018) | @IrishTimes
BoI braces for no-deal as rhetoric hardens (07/30/2018) | @IndoBusiness
Brexit uncertainty hits Ulster Bank’s credit rating (07/03/2019) | @rte
Ulster Bank chief in Republic sees no crash-out Brexit house price slump (08/02/2019) | @irishexaminer
Online shopping rules may no longer apply post Brexit (20/03/2019) | @rte
An Post is planning to roll out Parcel Motel-style delivery lockers (02/19/2019) | @thejournal_ie
An Post Chief says company could suffer from hard Brexit (10/05/2018) | @rte
Profit increases at Aviva Ireland on Friends First inclusion (08/08/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Aviva gets OK to shift €10bn to Ireland (02/20/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Aviva to transfer policies to Irish unit to prepare for Brexit (09/25/2018) | @BusInsMagazine,@IrishTimes

Brexit | @MazarsIreland
Owner of Irish stock exchange wants move to Brussels after Brexit (11/09/2018) | @IrishTimes
Euronext Dublin, one year on. (04/04/2019) | @Medium
The departure of the UK from the EU: implications for the Irish economy and financial system – Deputy Governor Sharon Donnery (05/03/2019) | @centralbank_ie
Central Bank warns of 110,000 fewer jobs in event of no-deal Brexit (06/19/2019) | @irishexaminer
34,000 fewer jobs after no-deal Brexit, Central Bank warns (07/31/2019) | @irishexaminer
Hard Brexit a threat to house prices – Central Bank warns (07/12/2019) | @IndoBusiness
New study estimates the impact of various Brexit scenarios on the Irish economy (03/26/2019) | @EsriIreland
Quarterly Economic Observer – Summer, 2019 | @NERI_research

Spending on no-deal Brexit stockpiling hits £4bn, survey suggests (12/08/2019) | @breakingnewsie
In Brexit, Could Ireland Wear the Crown (02/21/2019) | @Fortune
Brexit: A cheat sheet (01/31/2019) | @TechRepublic
Will Dublin Become Europe’s Regulatory Technology Hub After Brexit? (08/26/2018) | @Forbes
It’s Cool, It’s Well Wired, and It’s Staying in the EU (02/06/2018) | @datacenter
Ireland, a Jurisdiction of Choice and Gateway to Europe for Financial Institutions (PDF; 2017) | @ALGoodbody
A closer look at BREXIT: The case for Ireland (PDF) | @ESgloballaw
Over Ireland? Bothered by Brexit? Find that new home for your cloud (13/06/2016) | @TheRegister

Irish Organisations receive €912,684 thanks to Intel Employees (10/04/2019) | @EnterInnov
Intel to expand Irish production to meet global chip demand (10/21/2018) | @IndoBusiness
Intel to develop AI incubator programme at Talent Garden Dublin (15/10/2018) | @rte
Farmer who won appeal against IDA launches latest bid to stop Intel’s €3.6bn plant (13/08/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Microsoft’s Irish arm paid $77bn dividend to tech giant last year (05/25/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Microsoft announces creation of 200 new jobs at its Dublin campus (17/09/2018) | @IDAIreland
Take a guided tour of… Microsoft’s new Dublin HQ complete with in-office bakery (02/22/2018) | @thejournal_ie
Oracle Launches EMEA Recruitment Drive To Add 1,400 New Cloud Sales Professionals (14/01/2016) | @IDAIreland

‘Major milestone’ as Uniphar begins trading on Euronext Dublin (07/17/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Irish company Uniphar raises €150m from IPO (07/12/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Irish pharma group Uniphar plans IPO (06/17/2019) | @reuters
Jazz Pharma could shift EU roles from Oxford to Ireland (08/01/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Pharmaceuticals unlikely to avoid a harsh Brexit (02/26/2018) | @irishexaminer
Irish M&A tally falls in wake of $62bn Shire deal (07/04/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Takeda UK boss retains role after Shire acquisition (22/01/2019) | @ThePharmaLetter
Speech by an Taoiseach, Mr. Enda Kenny, T.D., Official opening of Shire’s new offices, Baggot St. (27/04/2017) | Government of Ireland
Takeda forecasts operating loss as Shire integration costs mount (05/14/2019) | @FT


UK Vol.151 (think tanks)


Ireland Vol.45 (Brexit: retail, food, dairy)

Dairy brand Glenilen Farm thinks there’s still ‘a lot of ground to conquer’ in Brexit Britain (05/17/2019) | @Fora_ie
Dunnes Retains Top Spot As Ireland’s Largest Grocery Retailer (03/12/2019) | @CheckoutIreland
Has Dunnes Stores abandoned UK market? (23/03/2018) | @ShelfLifedotie
Dunnes Stores shuts all Scottish stores over fears of cost of EU exit (03/19/2018) | @BelTel
David McWilliams: Ireland’s Dunnes-loving, cheese-eating unsqueezed middle (03/16/2019) | @IrishTimes
Hobnobs, flights and tea: The no-deal Brexit effect on our favourite things (01/15/2019) | @IrishTimes
Brexit reality finally set to bite for Irish business (12/10/2018) | @irishexaminer
Ireland’s Dunnes pulling out of Britain amid Brexit uncertainty (19/03/2018) | @FNW_WW
UL signs contracts to purchase Dunnes Stores site (25/05/2019) | @breakingnewsie
Hard Brexit could lead to 20pc drop in the level of UK trade to Ireland within a decade (06/02/2017) | @practicenet

SuperValu owner Musgrave turns to non-UK food suppliers due to Brexit (12/16/2018) | @IndoBusiness
Musgrave plans more retail brands (05/23/2018) | @irishexaminer
Musgrave warns Brexit will cause shopping exodus to Northern Ireland (04/29/2016) | @NewstalkFM
Brexit tariffs could trigger UK & Ireland recession, warns Musgrave CEO (06/08/2017) | @TheGrocer
Brexit-Related Tariffs Could Cause Recession, Warns Musgrave’s CEO (06/08/2017) | @CheckoutIreland
SuperValu warns of supply shortages after Unilever’s Brexit pricing row spreads to Ireland (10/13/2016) | @Fora_ie
Musgrave group sells off its British operation for £40m (05/22/2015) | @BelTel

Kerry Group keeps on top of changing consumer demands as revenues grow (08/08/2019) | @Fora_ie
Pricing in a no-deal Brexit (02/27/2019) | @IChronicle
Kerry Group warns of ‘extreme’ impact from no-deal Brexit (02/19/2019) | @irishexaminer
Kerry Group boss still ‘happy’ with Brexit plan despite share price fall (02/21/2018) | @BelTel
The impact of Brexit on Kerry Group (11/15/2017) | @digHBS
Goodman’s beef empire is at the heart of the Brexit storm but few would bet against him (04/01/2019) | @farming_indo
Irish companies secure multiple deals during Enterprise Ireland Scottish Trade Mission, the largest trade mission undertaken to the UK since Brexit vote (27/09/2018) | @EnterInnov
Farmers are in need of Brexit bailout (08/06/2018) | @irishexaminer
€50m China beef deal will ‘Brexit proof’ ABP – Goodman (05/16/2018) | @farming_indo
Brexit briefing calls on governments to work together to put measures in place to secure the bilateral trade relationship no matter what the outcome of the UK referendum. (23/06/2015) | @WilliamFryLaw

Hard Brexit may not be the end for Irish farmers (03/28/2019) | @TCDBusiness
Irish agriculture and food & beverage sector set for M&A uplift in 2018 (29/03/2018) | @Consultancy_uk
Ireland’s beef exporters fret over Brexit disruption (01/03/2018) | @FT
Analysis: Brexit heralds a new Dawn for meat sector (03/20/2017) | @farming_indo
DAWN MEATS & DUNBIA AGREE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP | @DunbiaGroup
An Irish meat processor has acquired a UK rival to help Brexit-proof its business (07/30/2018) | @Fora_ie
Minister ‘reaches out’ to Beef Plan Movement to enter talks (08/08/2019) | @thejournal_ie
Global focus: A blueprint for export diversification (02/05/2018) | @farmersjournal
Ireland launches meat tech R&D initiative (04/18/2017) | @MeatPoultry
Glanbia stockpiling materials in UK as it prepares for hard Brexit (02/21/2019) | @IndoBusiness
UK food industry boss issues new warning over no-deal Brexit as stockpiling continues (24/01/2019) | @just_food
Irish Farmers Journal nightly news: Glanbia spin-out and Brexit fund calls (01/09/2017) | @farmersjournal

Tesco pulls British products from Irish stores amid Brexit uncertainty (03/25/2019) | @retailgazette
Tesco share price falls despite sales growth in Ireland (24/06/2019) | @ShelfLifedotie
Tesco Warns October Brexit Much More Problematic Than March (14/06/2019) | @CheckoutIreland
Tesco insists Irish staff unaffected as supermarket slashes jobs across UK business (01/28/2019) | @IndoBusiness
Tesco Supermarket in Britain Will Cut Thousands of Jobs (01/28/2019) | @nytimes
Brexit faces being DELAYED to end of 2019: New MP COUP to prevent no deal (01/16/2019) | @Daily_Express
Tesco and M&S stockpile tinned food to prepare for no-deal Brexit (10/01/2019) | @guardian
Tesco Ireland offers free delivery to people aged 65 and over (05/10/2019) | @IrishMirror
Tesco is launching budget brand Jack’s to rival Aldi and Lidl – but it’s not coming to Ireland (09/18/2018) | @Fora_ie
Brexit vs. Tesco: Will Britain’s Largest Grocer Stand the Ultimate Test? (11/15/2017) | @digHBS
Tesco pulls Marmite from online store amid Brexit price row with Unilever (13/10/2016) | @Telegraph

Is Walgreens Losing Money? – Market Mad House (08/13/2019) | @medium
Boots store closures: More than 200 UK branches face closure – is your Boots at risk? (05/29/2019) | @Daily_Express
Boots warns of possible store closures (03/04/2019) | @BBC
Amazon isn’t the only threat keeping Walgreens up at night (06/14/2019) | @CrainsChicago
Multiples follow ‘no stockpiling’ advice as no-deal Brexit risk grows (21/12/2018) | @ChemistDruggist
Brexit could lead to a significant shortage of pharmacists, says CCA (17/07/2018) | @PJOnline_News
Uncertainty looms for Illinois companies affected by Brexit (03/29/2017) | @chicagotribune
Can Walgreens Survive Brexit? (07/16/2016) | @SeekingAlpha
How Brexit Hurts Walgreens Boots Alliance (07/07/2016) | @forbes

Retail industry bodies warn on the effects of a ‘no deal’ Brexit (21/02/2019) | @etail
Irish Operations Of M&S, Iceland To Be Hardest Hit By ‘No-Deal’ Brexit (08/02/2016) | @CheckoutIreland
M&S reveals ‘difficult’ trading conditions in Ireland (07/07/2016) | @IndoBusiness
220 UK-based Primark roles moving to Dublin HQ (03/07/2019) | @retailgazette
Primark owner AB Foods says no-deal Brexit would be ‘reckless’ (17/01/2019) | @RTE
PRIMARK EXPANSION: THE IMPACT OF BREXIT ON ITS PROFIT MARGINS (03/03/2017) | @MarketLine_core
Pernod Ricard stockpiling in case of a no-deal Brexit (31/01/2019) | @breakingnewsie
Jameson owner echoes Brexit warning: Jameson owner echoes Brexit warning (10/05/2018) | @irishexaminer
How will Brexit affect Irish spirits producers? (24/03/2017) | @SpiritsBusiness


Missouri Vol.6 (University of Missouri)


UK Vol.150 (think tanks)


https://twitter.com/IPPR/status/1148556552380518401


https://twitter.com/IPPR/status/1148164761491841024


https://twitter.com/IPPR/status/1146342063459459072


https://twitter.com/Comm_Links/status/1148590708581945346


https://twitter.com/emsie40/status/1157300303466815490


Ireland Vol.44 (Brexit)

IRELAND & THE IMPACTS OF BREXIT: STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS FOR IRELAND ARISING FROM CHANGING EU-UK TRADING RELATIONS (PDF; 02/2018; prepared for the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation) | Copenhagen Economics

pp.5-6
– A European Economic Area (EEA) scenario, where we assume similar levels of trade costs between the EU and the UK as are currently observed between the EU and the EEA members (Norway and Iceland). The scenario includes duty free trade for most products, though with some tariffs on sensitive products within the agri-food sectors. Border inspections on EU-UK trade will add customs costs. The risk of regulatory divergence for both goods and services is lowest in this scenario.
– A Customs Union (CU) scenario, where we assume that the EU and the UK agree on a traditional customs union agreement. The scenario includes duty free trade for most products, though with some tariffs on sensitive products within the agri-food sectors. Border inspections on EU-UK trade will add customs costs. This scenario implies a higher risk of regulatory divergence for both goods and services relative to an EEA-like scenario, as a standard customs union does not cover regulatory issues for goods and does not address service trade.
– A Free trade agreement (FTA) scenario, where we assume that the EU and the UK agree on a free trade agreement (FTA). We use the effects of an average EU FTA as midpoint estimate, and the scenario includes duty free trade for most products, though with some tariffs on sensitive products within the agri-food sectors. Border inspections on EU-UK trade will add customs costs. As in the customs union scenario, there is a risk of emerging regulatory divergence between the EU and the UK in both goods and services.
– A WTO Scenario (WTO) scenario, where we assume that trade will be governed by WTO rules and other WTO agreements. In this case, the UK and the EU will impose MFN tariffs on each other’s goods where these are not bound by existing plurilateral agreements or arrangements. In addition, we assume that the EU and the UK will continue to use tariff rate quotas both between them and with third countries, which implies that the effective
p.7
– Agri-food, where processed foods, beef, sheep and other cattle meat and dairy are the sub-sectors in which the largest impacts occur, and where trade and production are predicted to fall significantly below the non-Brexit baseline level in 2030. Production in other primary agriculture sub-sectors such as grains, fruit and vegetables, forestry and fishing etc. will also be negatively affected – however, to a smaller extent. Impacts in the agri-food sector are driven by a combination of tariffs, customs costs and the risk of regulatory divergence.
– Pharma-Chemicals, which is the absolute largest export sector in Ireland. Our analysis shows that production in the sector could fall by 1-5 per cent below the non-Brexit baseline production level in 2030. Impacts in this sector are almost exclusively driven by the risk of regulatory divergence and increased border costs.
– Electrical machinery, which includes different types of electronic equipment such as computers, televisions and communication equipment, is another large export sector. Production in this sector is predicted to fall by 5-10 per cent below the non-Brexit baseline production level in 2030. Customs costs and the risk of regulatory divergence are the main factors driving the impacts in this sector.
– Wholesale and retail is an important sector in Ireland. The sector could face new costs in their supply chains as a result of diverging regulatory requirements. The sector will also be negatively affected by an overall drop in consumer demand resulting from Brexit.
– Air transport, which could face substantial challenges on routes to the UK as a result of Brexit.
p.8
… Measured relative to Irish GDP in 2015, the difference between the “best” (EEA) scenario and the “worst” (WTO) is €11 billion in 2030 (in 2015 levels). In a hypothetical situation, where regulatory divergence for goods and services could be avoided and where the Brexit impacts only relate to tariffs and border costs, the theoretical loss to Irish GDP would be further reduced to around 1 per cent of GDP or approximately €3 billion in 2015 terms.
With the objective of minimizing the overall economic loss to Irish GDP, the best possible trade negotiation outcome for Ireland would be an agreement that has an acceptable balance of rights and obligations for all parties and with the following main elements:
– No tariffs
– Large quotas for agricultural products
– Low border costs
– Landbridge transit
– Low regulatory divergence
– Low barriers for service trade

1. Trade promotion policies (e.g. helping existing exporters to access new markets, or new exporters to engage in exporting)
2. Enterprise policies (e.g. helping the transition from declining to growing sectors)
3. Skills policies (e.g. supporting skills required by the unavoidable adjustments)
p.11 Figure 1. Ireland-UK trade and investment relation

p.12 Figure 2. Irish trade with the UK and the rest of the world, 2015
p.13 Figure 3. Intensity of trade with the UK
p.14
… Besides both being EU members since 1973, there are many other underlying and historical reasons for why Ireland is uniquely exposed to Brexit:
– Common border and language: First of all, the UK is Ireland’s nearest neighbour and the only country with whom we share a land border. In addition, Ireland and the UK are both English speaking countries
– All Island economy: There is a wellfunctioning all island economy with fully integrated commuting patterns and shopping habits, and a closely knitted value chain across the Island
– Common Travel Area: A common travel area is in existence between Ireland and the UK since the 1920s
– Same consumer taste: In terms of consumer preferences, Ireland and the UK are in many aspects considered as one market with similar tastes and identical products being offered
– Common-law basis of legal systems: The UK and Ireland both have a common-law legal system, which places greater emphasis on previous court decisions, compared to a civillaw legal system, which is in place in other European countries.
– Joint commercial contracts: Commercially, there is a very close integration of business and enterprises across the Irish-UK market. The UK and Ireland are often treated as one market, e.g. in the organisation of many companies, and reflected in many commercial contracts
– UK-only exporters and importers: Like many countries, Irish SMEs are less active in international trade compared to larger enterprises. As a special feature, many of Ireland’s exporting and importing SME’s have the UK as the first and only export/import market and is hence extremely exposed to Brexit
– UK landbridge: Two-thirds of Irish goods exporters make use of the UK landbridge to access continental markets.
p.15 Box 1. UK landbridge is key for Irish trade with the rest of EU
…the agri-food sector where an average of around 40 per cent of exports are destined for the UK. For specific sub-sectors, the UK market accounts for an even greater share of exports, including beef (47 per cent), cheese (60 per cent) and mushrooms (90 per cent)…
…the impact is likely to be more pronounced amongst indigenous firms who account for between 80 and 100 per cent of enterprises in the agri-food sector …
p.16 Figure 4. Exposure to UK market at sector level

p.17 Figure 5. Loss of income due to drop in exchange rate
p.18 Figure 6. UK investment of around €40 bn in Ireland in 2015
p.19 Figure 7. Irish investment in the UK around €90 bn in 2015
p.20
…for the transition period immediately after Brexit in March 2019:
-“Soft Brexit”: This scenario represents a transition arrangement in which duty free trade is continued and no customs clearance procedures are implemented, which in essence means that the UK will remain in the Single Market during the transition period. While this will require a regulatory freeze in the UK and will require the UK to maintain all current regulation aligned to the EU Single Market rules, the scenario assumes a moderate increase in trade costs for both goods and services to reflect the uncertainty around the future trade relationship and the risk of future regulatory divergence.
-“Hard Brexit”: In this scenario, there is no transitional arrangement between the EU and the UK, and both the EU and the UK will implement MFN tariffs on goods, border procedures, and there will be some emerging deviations in regulation for both services and goods. Furthermore, the scenario assumes additional transit costs for Irish goods exported to the European continent across the UK landbridge due to the delays and infrastructural challenges that are expected to materialise in the scenario.
p.21 Figure 8. Future relationship (Barnier slide)

pp.22-23
– EEA:…duty free trade for most products although with some tariffs on sensitive products within selected agri-food sectors. …regulatory alignment with the Single Market rules (e.g. including mutual recognition agreements, harmonisation of some standards, etc.). …will become necessary to impose border inspections on EU-UK trade by whatever means. …UK exporters will be facing higher costs of exporting related to border controls, tariffs and emerging regulatory differences. …
– CU:…the EU and the UK would continue to have a common external trade policy, and the UK will not be able to negotiate its own free trade agreements independently of the EU. Just as in the case of an EEA solution or an FTA solution, the UK exit from the Single Market implies that border checks on EU-UK trade will be needed, unless political agreement on their removal can be reached. …
– FTA:…duty free trade for most products although with some tariffs on sensitive products within selected agrifood sectors. …very limited ability to ensure regulatory alignment with the Single Market rules…
– WTO:…impose MFN tariffs on each other’s goods where these are not bound by other agreements or arrangements. …grant duty free trade on a range of listed products between the signatories… …tariff rate quotas (TRQs) on a range of products whereby imports from third countries can enter the EU with zero or low tariffs up to a certain quantity for a given time period, …
p.24 Figure 9. Overview of scenarios
p.25
…the complexity of the rules of origins…, the sensitivity of the good to delays… and the complexity of the value chain of the affected good
…In the EEA scenario, the average regulatory costs are estimated at 7 per cent corresponding to the average of the EU’s other EEA agreements (with Norway and Iceland).
In the Customs Union and FTA… on average 10 per cent… corresponding to the average of the EU’s other FTAs.
Finally, in the WTO… …increase up to 24 per cent…
p.27
If no regulatory divergence occurs between the EU and the UK, Irish goods exports will face additional trade costs related to tariffs and customs procedures corresponding to an average 4-5 per cent trade cost in the EEA, CU and FTA scenarios and around 7-8 per cent additional trade cost in the WTO-scenario. …
If regulatory divergence occurs in the long run… EEA…12 CU…14 FTA…14 WTO…32 …
p.32 Figure 11. Long-term impact of BREXIT on Ireland’s total exports

p.33 Figure 12. Long-term impact of BREXIT on Ireland’s total imports

p.34 Figure 13. Long-term impact of BREXIT on Ireland’s GDP

p.35 Figure 14. Development of Ireland’s GDP with and without Brexit

p.36 Figure 15. Impact on real wages for Irish high and low skilled workers
p.38 Figure 17. Ireland’s goods trade per sector with UK and the Rest of the World

p.39 Figure 18. Ireland’s trade per sector with UK and the Rest of the World
p.40
Figure 19. Ireland’s key goods export sectors to the UK

Figure 20. Ireland’s key service export sectors to the UK
p.41 Figure 21. Key goods import sectors from the UK

p.42 Figure 22. Key service import sectors from the UK
p.43 Figure 23. Output changes in two scenarios for Brexit in 2030

p.45 Figure 25. Key sectors explain over 90 per cent of GDP impact

p.46 Figure 26. Profile of key sectors
pp.46-51
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [processed foods]
– Total exports in the processed food sector would be 15-31 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios respectively, and 16-17 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios.
– Exports to the UK would be 40-87 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios respectively, and 45-49 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios
– Production in the sector would also be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from -10 per cent (EEA) to -21 per cent (WTO) compared to the 2030 baseline production level. The impact in the CU and FTA scenarios is -11 per cent to -12 per cent.
– Employment would be affected proportionately to production in the scenarios, i.e. a 10 per cent reduction in production would lead to a 10 per cent reduction in employment compared to the 2030 baseline.
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [beef, sheep and other cattle meat]
– Total exports from the beef sector would be 18 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and CU scenario and 35 per cent below in the WTO scenario. In the FTA scenario, the impact would be 22 per cent below the baseline.
– Exports to the UK would be 29-53 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios respectively, and 28-35 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios.
– Production in the sector would also be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from -11 per cent (EEA) to -23 per cent (WTO) compared to the 2030 baseline production level. The impact in the CU and FTA scenarios would be -12 per cent and -14 per cent.
– Employment would be affected proportionately.
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [dairy]
– Total exports from the dairy sector would be 18 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA scenario and 40 per cent below in the WTO scenario. In the FTA and CU scenarios the impact would be 19 and 20 per cent below baseline, respectively.
– Exports to the UK would be 35 to 76 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios, respectively and 37 to 38 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios.
– Production in the sector would also be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from -8 per cent (EEA) to -18 per cent (WTO) compared to the 2030 baseline production level. The impact in the CU and FTA scenarios would be -9 per cent to -10 per cent.
– Employment would be affected proportionately.
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [pharmaceuticals and chemicals]
– Total exports from the pharma-chemicals sector would only be 1-5 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the scenarios analysed … A 5 per cent decline in exports from this sector is, however, still a large amount given the size of the sector (a 5 per cent drop in pharma-chemicals is for example more than the entirety of Irish beef exports).
– Exports to the UK would be 7-42 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios respectively, and 20 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios
– Production in the sector would also be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from 1-5 per cent below the 2030 baseline production level.
– Employment would not be equally affected since the sector would still be one of the more productive sectors and can offer attractive wages, which would help to retain and attract labour from other sectors in Ireland.
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [electrical machinery]
– Total exports to the world from the electrical machinery sector would be 5-9 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the scenarios analysed.
– Exports to the UK would be 34-40 per cent below the 2030 non-Brexit baseline level in the EEA and WTO scenarios, respectively and 20 per cent below in the FTA and CU scenarios.
– Production in the sector would also be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from 5-10 per cent below the 2030 baseline production level.
– Employment would be 2-5 per cent below the baseline employment since the sector would still be one of the more productive sectors and can offer attractive wages, which would help to retain and attract labour from other sectors in Ireland.
Impacts on production and exports in the sector [wholesale and retail]
– Total exports from the retail and wholesale sector is in itself not the key parameter. Rather, the impact in the sector is seen more clearly from the increased costs of imports of various consumer goods from the UK, most notably processed foods.
– Production in the sector would be negatively affected in all scenarios ranging from 2-4 per cent below the 2030 baseline production level depending on the scenario.
– Employment would be relatively less affected since a large number of retail outlets around the country would still be needed despite a drop in demand.
pp.51-55 4.8 Impacts in other service sectors
Air transport
Financial Services
Insurance
ICT and Business Services
Tourism
pp.56-59 CHAPTER 5 Policy Options for Ireland
5.1 Negotiating the best possible outcome
… The EEA-scenario will reduce Ireland’s GDP to a level 2.8 per cent below the non-Brexit baseline (or €7 billion in 2015-levels) compared to a WTO-scenario, which is foreseen to bring Irish GDP 7.0 per cent below the non-Brexit baseline in 2030 (corresponding to €18 billion in 2015-level). …
… In a hypothetical situation, where regulatory divergence for goods and services could also be avoided, and hence the Brexit impacts only related to tariffs and border costs, then the theoretical loss to Irish GDP would be further reduced to around 1 per cent impact on GDP or approximately €3 billion in 2015-level. …
…the best possible trade negotiation outcome for Ireland would be…
– No tariffs: Avoid imposition of any tariffs on future EU-UK trade – duty free for all products
– Large quotas: If some tariffs have to remain on agriculture products, sufficiently large tariff quotas should be pursued to cater for expected future trade levels
– Low border costs: EU-UK border costs on both sides should be minimised by using state-of-the art technology and procedures, including use of authorised economic operators as much as possible to minimize border costs
– Landbridge transit: Arrangements should be made to ensure undisturbed transit to/from Ireland via the UK landbridge
– Low regulatory divergence: Mechanisms should be put in place between the EU and the UK to avoid and minimize regulatory divergence and protect against emerging divergence as the EU or the UK develops their technical regulation further. Such mechanisms and the related dispute resolution mechanisms should apply to all areas currently covered by common EU regulation and rules (the harmonised area). For Ireland, this is important generally and would, in particular, be important for:
≫ Beef
≫ Dairy
≫ Processed food
≫ Pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and chemicals
≫ Electrical machinery
– Low barriers for service trade: As for goods, similar mechanisms would be needed for services to avoid regulatory divergences and excessive trade costs. This would be important for all Irish service sectors, and notably for:
≫ Air transport
≫ Financial and insurance services (continued passporting, or strong equivalence)
5.3 Domestic enterprise policy responses to mitigate Brexit impacts (minimizing threats)
…three broad categories:
– Trade promotion policies (e.g. helping existing exporters to access new markets, or new exporters to engage in exporting)
– Enterprise policies (e.g. helping the transition from declining to growing sectors)
– Skills policies (e.g. supporting skills required by the unavoidable adjustments)
5.4 Domestic policies to pursue the opportunities from Brexit
Trade opportunities
Just as Irish exporters will face new barriers in the UK market, so will UK exporters in the EU market. This implies that UK products or services will be more expensive in the EU market, meaning that customers in other EU countries currently served by UK firms will be looking for alternative suppliers. This can present opportunities for Irish exporters, especially since there are many overlaps in the products export from the UK and from Ireland. One example could be cheese exports, where Irish cheese could replace British cheese in other EU markets. And similarly, for other products or services. These adjustments are already factored into to our analyses and quantifications, but the extent to which it takes place in reality depends on the actions taken by Irish exporters and how these opportunities are supported by Irish policy actions.
Talent opportunities
The general decline in economic activity in the UK following Brexit and in particular the uncertainty and sentiment of EU citizens in the UK presents another opportunity for Ireland. As the only English speaking country in the EU, aside from Malta, and with diverse job opportunities, Ireland can become a new home for talents deciding to leave the UK post-Brexit. This would particularly relevant in sectors and positions where there are already shortages in Ireland and where even the best re-schooling and job training (as per above) cannot meet the demand. This could include IT-specialists, researchers, financial service expert for example. Again, active and timely policies from the Irish government and local authorities can help maximise these opportunities.
Investment opportunities
The biggest opportunities in relation to Brexit is likely to be within the investment area. Ireland is already an attractive location in Europe for foreign direct investment (FDI), and with the right additional policies, Ireland should be wellplaced to attract entire companies or parts of multinational companies wanting to be located within the EU and in an English speaking common law country.


UK Vol.149 (think tanks)


https://twitter.com/CHAsiaPacific/status/1148145838499225600


https://twitter.com/thefabians/status/1156134385411923968


https://twitter.com/thefabians/status/1154776965808820224


https://twitter.com/BenCooper1995/status/1156864232501239808


https://twitter.com/BenCooper1995/status/1148538093923983361


UK Vol.148 (think tanks)

https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1156899125197099008


https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1156499064927789056


https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1154317088200306688


https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1152209025372688384


https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1151432781957873664
https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1151076508783521793
https://twitter.com/NEF/status/1151056753532055552


https://twitter.com/SurvivalEditors/status/1151846079836692480UK


UK Vol.147 (think tanks)


https://twitter.com/OpenEurope/status/1153956306644099072


UK Vol.146 (think tanks)


https://twitter.com/HJS_Org/status/1152509486768242688
https://twitter.com/HJS_Org/status/1151799766235394054


https://twitter.com/HJS_Org/status/1149684879535300608


https://twitter.com/HJS_Org/status/1148235652586229761


https://twitter.com/NIESRorg/status/1155529852650262533
https://twitter.com/NIESRorg/status/1155375082715267073


https://twitter.com/ArnoHan/status/1149129573260496896


European Union Vol.8 (Commission, Council, Parliament)


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1151024126724849669


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1151793936832389121


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1151431504108642305


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1150440864138686464


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1149628415110082560


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1149577884329058304
https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1149565321537314816


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1149320685476634624


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1148954184290570240


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1148895294165266432


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1148633525521985537
https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1148539463871750146


https://twitter.com/JunckerEU/status/1146712235571666944


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1148982562922160129


https://twitter.com/EUCouncil/status/1151890835388149760


New Zealand Vol.16 (including University of Canterbury, University of Waikato, Lincoln University, Massey University)


https://twitter.com/UCNZscience/status/1144808248219852800


https://twitter.com/waikato/status/1101215110142427136


https://twitter.com/MFATgovtNZ/status/1129191224261267457


https://twitter.com/MFATgovtNZ/status/1019718113405751296
https://twitter.com/MFATgovtNZ/status/986350756520312832


https://twitter.com/EU_Commission/status/1023879206265077760


https://twitter.com/DanielJHannan/status/1033654052436017152


https://twitter.com/tradegovuk/status/999351775634305027


https://twitter.com/usembassynz/status/1034656837801369600


https://twitter.com/RFStew/status/955611837554282497


https://twitter.com/MFATgovtNZ/status/1082015700229738496


Canada Vol.39 (University of Toronto)

https://twitter.com/UofT/status/1138446363757355008
https://twitter.com/UofT/status/1123286149844361216


Free papers, reports, et al. Vol.50 (paper.li February – June 2019)